5 ways Russia trolled the US on July 4th

Russia is an expert-level troll.

During the Cold War, Syria remained a staunch ally to the Soviet Union – a source of power and stability for the Assad regime. In 2012, the United States began supporting Syrian rebels, stepping into the conflict and into Russia’s backyard.

Syrian Civil War 2012

Remember when Syrian battle maps had only three colors and non of them were ISIS? Good times.

Ever since, the Russians have made it a point to antagonize the Americans at every opportunity. Not being content to cross “red lines” and annex Crimea, Putin expertly trolls the U.S. and its president every Independence Day.

2016: Vladimir Putin addresses the American people

President Putin took the time to write to the U.S. about his wish for better relations.

Putin Troll Wink Send Nukes meme

“?????????? ??????? ???? ??????.”

“The history of Russian-American relations shows that when we act as equal partners and respect each other’s lawful interests, we are able to successfully resolve the most complex international issues for the benefit of both countries’ peoples and all of humanity,” Putin wrote to President Obama.

At the time, he was directing an all-out effort to disrupt the American election with a coordinated misinformation campaign.

2015: Russian bombers drop by to say hello

American fighters intercept two Russian bombers 39 miles off the coast of California. Upon interception, the Russians radio the Americans:

“Good morning, American pilots. We are here to greet you on your 4th of July Independence Day.”

Russian President Vladimir Putin was on the phone with President Obama the entire time, calling to wish him a Happy Independence Day.

Obama Putin Call

“Zdravstvuyte. Is refrigerator running?”

At the same time, Russian aircraft are intercepted in the Alaska Air Defense Identification Zone.

2014: Russian bombers intercepted off of Alaska and California

American F-22 Raptors intercept four long-range Tupolev 95 Bear H bombers and their aerial refueler just 200 miles off the coast of North America.

F-22 Raptor intercept Russian Bear In Alaska

They actually do that a lot. This photo is from 2007. Just not July 4, 2007.

Two of them veer off back to Russian airspace while the other two skirt U.S. airspace 50 miles from the California coastline.

2013: Infamous Russian spy publicly proposes to Edward Snowden

Fully 10 days into his permanent residency in Russia, American whistleblower Edward Snowden received a public marriage proposal from Anna Chapman (aka Anna Vasil’yevna Kushchyenko), an outed Russian spy– which was quickly spread by Russian state media.

Anna Chapman Snowden Russia

Everything we learned about Russian spies from movies was right. Apparently.

Chapman was exchanged with nine other Russian agents in 2010, garnering notoriety because of her bright red hair, history of modeling, and Cold War-era spy story.

She publicly tweeted her proposal more than once, even asking the NSA to babysit their potential children.

2012: Nuclear-capable bombers enter Alaska Air Defense Zone

The 200-mile zone between the U.S. and Russia was penetrated by two Tu-95 Bear H Bombers on July 4, 2012, but the planes did not enter American airspace.

Defense officials called it “Putin’s 4th of July Bear greeting to Obama.”

Russian Bear

“Sup.”

Any Russian aircraft entering the area are always intercepted by American fighters, but this time it was notable because it happened on Independence Day – the first of many to come.

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