This combat controller kept taking it to the enemy after he was shot in the chest

 

Robert Gutierrez Combat controller JTAC poses with green beret. Gutierrez won the Air Force Cross for extraordinary valor in Afghanistan.

Photo: US Air Force

Air Force Staff Sgt. Robert Gutierrez had accompanied top special operators in some of the most dangerous missions of the War on Terror, including the Battle of Shok Valley. He was a combat controller assigned to Army Special Forces, calling in attack runs from aircraft supporting the Green Berets.

In 2009 he was tested like never before when, during a raid to capture a high-level Taliban leader, Gutierrez was shot in the chest. The round passed through his lung, collapsing it and ripping a chunk out of his back.

Gutierrez had seen this kind of wound before and estimated he had three minutes left to live.

“I thought about [my job], what I would do before I bled out,” Gutierrez told Fox News while discussing the raid. “That I would change the world in those three minutes, I’d do everything I could to get my guys out safely before I died.”

He stayed on the radio, calling in strikes from aircraft to help the team escape alive. At one point, enemy fighters were lined up on a wall only 30 feet from him. Gutierrez called in three A-10 danger close gun runs against the fighters. The rounds struck so close to Gutierrez that his ear drums burst from the explosions. After the first of the three runs, he allowed an Army medic to insert a needle into his lung, relieving some of the pressure that was forcing his lungs closed. It was the only time he came off the radio despite his injuries.

In fact, through all the chaos of the fight, Gutierrez remained so calm and clear on the radio that the pilots supporting the operation didn’t realize he was injured until he was removed from the battlefield.

“He said he would be off of the mic for a few to handle his gunshot wounds,” Air Force Capt. Ethan Sabin told Business Insider. “Until that point he was calm, cool and collected.

Gutierrez was medically evacuated from the battle after nearly four hours of fighting and losing over half of his blood. No American lives were lost in the raid, a success credited largely to Gutierrez’s extraordinary actions. He recovered from his wounds and was awarded the Air Force Cross, second only to the Medal of Honor for valor awards.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qaldro88PgM

NOW: This single Afghan battle resulted in 10 Silver Stars and an Air Force Cross >

OR: Medal of Honor: Meet the 16 heroes of Iraq and Afghanistan who received the nation’s highest honor >

TOP ARTICLES
Here are the best military photos for the week of November 18th

The military has talented photographers who capture what life as a service member is like during training and at war. Here are their best photos this week.

7 nasty ways Kim Jong Un executes people

Kim Jong Un can come up with some very creatively nasty ways to kill people for "crimes" like falling asleep during a speech or possessing a Bible.

The Navy is very sorry about the sky dick

The Navy is issuing an apology after one of its aircraft crews used contrails to draw a giant picture of male genitalia in the air over Omak.

That time when the USS Missouri gave full honors to a kamikaze pilot

Kamikaze pilots commonly struck fear in the hearts of allied troops with their choreographed nose-dives right into U.S. ships during World War II.

This is how the Israelis planned to kill Saddam Hussein

Saddam wasn't crazy for using all those body doubles. People were really trying to kill him. Israel never forgot his Gulf War Scud missile attacks.

The 13 funniest memes for the week of Nov. 17

Justice League comes out this weekend but you don't care. You've been waiting for your Justice League enlistment to end for years. These memes are for you.

This is what you need to know about Mark Esper, the new Army Secretary

The new Army Secretary is a retired officer whose service includes active duty in the Gulf War, as well as time in the reserves and the National Guard.

The Army tested its first damage sensors on these helicopters

For the first time ever, a team of researchers successfully developed and tested networked acoustic emission sensors that can detect airframe damage.

The American caught crossing the DMZ wanted to be a negotiator

The 58 year-old US citizen who attempted to cross the border between North and South Korea wanted to help Pyongyang and Washington negotiate.

This is how the 'largest defense bill in history' pushes troops to stay in uniform

The House passed a nearly $700 billion bipartisan defense bill on Nov. 14, boosting what some politicians have called a depleted US military.