A French soldier just broke the long-distance shooting record by hitting a target over 2 miles away

french_ministry_of_defense

French Warrant Officer Benjamin, of the 1st Regiment of Chasseurs d’Afrique. (Photo by French Ministry of Defense)

A French soldier has broken the world’s long-distance shooting record after successfully hitting a target from over two miles away.

On August 22, a Warrant Officer Benjamin, the leader of the armored platoon in the 1st Regiment of Chasseurs d’Afrique, and his support team broke the world record for long-distance shooting after successfully hitting a target 2.29 miles (3695 meters) away.

This feat broke the previous, and still impressive, record of hitting a target from 2.11 miles (3400 meters) away.

According to a French militarypress release, Benjamin and his team prepared for three years to break the world record. But it was not until a training in June 2014 that the team realized that a record-breaking shot was within their reach. During that month of training, the team managed to hit a target of 1.84 miles (2960 meters) in four out of seven attempted shots.

Following this success, the team continued to work with a goal of roughly 2.29 miles in mind. At such distances, a number of factors come into play that could influence the shot, such as atmospheric pressure and slight variations in wind speed.

To compensate, the team trained on the technical aspects of the shot and only practiced the actual shooting on a range once every two weeks.

The emphasis on technique and teamwork payed off. On August 22, at the range in Canjuers, Warrant Officer Benjamin scored his winning hit of 2.11 miles. Still, he believes that full credit does not just belong to him.

“These shots are feasible only with a team,” he said in a French military press release. “Target spotters, wind spotters, radio link, a coach for corrections, it is truly a team sport.”

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