That time Nixon wanted commies to think he was crazy enough to nuke them

Eighteen B-52 bombers took off from Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington on October 10, 1969, each loaded with nuclear weapons. Although the bombers were headed toward Moscow, the goal was to influence outcomes around Hanoi. The bombers’ mission was to proceed directly to the Soviet Union in order to convince the Soviets that America at the hands of President Nixon was willing to resort to nuclear war to win in Vietnam.

A critical component of Nixon’s foreign policy was to make the leaders of the Soviet Union and the Eastern Bloc think he was insane — like really insane — and he wanted the Communist leaders of the world to believe that he was ready to start World War III to prevent communist expansion.

Nixon President Official Photo

“I will f**king cut you.”

“I want the North Vietnamese to believe I’ve reached the point where I might do anything to stop the war,” Nixon told his Chief of Staff. “We’ll just slip the word to them that, ‘for God’s sake, you know Nixon is obsessed about communism. We can’t restrain him when he’s angry — and he has his hand on the nuclear button’ and Ho Chi Minh himself will be in Paris in two days begging for peace.”

Tough talk against a guy who went on the record willing to lose 10 Vietnamese for every invader.

Ho Chi Minh North Vietnam Communist

“IDFWU” Love, Ho.

In 1968, Nixon campaigned on ending the war in Vietnam, but well into his first year in office, the North Vietnamese vowed to sit at the bargaining table in Paris “until the chairs rot.” Nixon wanted the Soviet leadership, widely seen as the puppeteers of North Vietnam’s leaders, to force the Vietnamese regime to conclude a peace agreement. The true intent of the plan was so secret, not even Gen. Bruce K. Holloway, commander of the Air Force’s Strategic Air Command knew the mission’s true purpose. The facts about the operation, called Giant Lance, were not made public until a 2000 Freedom of Information Act request revealed it.

FOIA Freedom of Information

“FOIA: Because it’s so much worse than you thought.”

The bombers flew along Soviet airspace for three days as other nuclear forces around the world — destroyers, cruisers, and aircraft carriers in the Atlantic, Mediterranean, Gulf of Aden, and Sea of Japan — all executed secret maneuvers that were designed to be detectable by the Kremlin. In response Soviet Ambassador Anatoly Dobrynin met with Nixon to discuss the raised state of alert of U.S. forces.

The Madman Theory worked in that respect. Dobrynin warned the Soviet leadership that “Nixon is unable to control himself even in a conversation with a foreign ambassador,” about Nixon’s “growing emotionalism” and his “lack of balance.” Nixon would order an end to Giant Lance suddenly on October 30.

B-52 Giant Lance 1968 Nixon Vietnam Cold War

A B-52 takes off in support of Giant Lance. Presumably, everyone on board is slightly nervous. (U.S. Air Force Photo)

The plan didn’t end the war in Vietnam, however. It was the president’s belief his Madman Theory did lead to agreeable terms for the SALT I (Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty) and his anti-ballistic missile treaties with the Soviet Union in 1972. That same year Nixon would drive the North Vietnamese back to the bargaining table each time they tried to leave through a series of bombing campaigns on North Vietnamese targets with operations Linebacker and Linebacker II.

"Peace through strength" (Photo from USAF 8th Tactical Fighter Wing)

“Peace through strength” (Photo from USAF 8th Tactical Fighter Wing)

NOW SEE: 17 Wild Facts About the Vietnam War

OR:  This Marine was the ‘American Sniper’ of the Vietnam War

TOP ARTICLES
This is the real reason John McCain's Liberty Medal speech was so epic

When US media focused on a jab at President Trump, they missed the parting thoughts of a veteran and public servant of more than 60 years.

This little bot can take a lickin' and keep on tickin' for troops on assault

Weighing a little over five pounds, the FirstLook can handle being thrown into a hostile environment.

This is one of the deadliest kamikaze attacks caught on film

Japanese kamikaze pilots struck fear in the hearts of allied troops as they conducted choreographed nose-dives right into U.S. warships during WWII.

This is what it was like fighting alongside Afghan troops

In nearly every war in which America has taken part, troops have had to work alongside local forces who aren't always very motivated to fight.

This is how AC/DC helped save a POW in Mogadishu

The ending of "Black Hawk Down" was just slightly different than Ridley Scott showed. It was a moment former POW Mike Durant would never forget.

Russia is buying more of these 'Fullback' fighter jets — and they're pretty impressive

The Russian Ministry of Defense says it just got four more SU-34 bombers, and they're impressive AF. We have the details and video for you here.

More than 100 killed in Taliban attacks across Afghanistan

The Afghan Defense Ministry is reporting over 100 Afghan deaths in October. The Taliban killed Afghan police officers and soldiers, and civilians.

The US Navy just launched an effort to built this is the super-stealthy submarine

The USS South Dakota — a Block-III Virginia Class attack submarine — has officially been christened. We have the details and how it compares to its peers.

This is how the War of Independence was won in the trenches

In order to beat the British at Yorktown, Gen. George Washington had to summon his inner groundhog and convince the French to soil their pretty hands.

This .50 cal machine gun fires twice as fast as the legendary Ma Deuce

The new Gatling-style GAU-19/B can send 1,300 rounds a minute downrange.