16 photos that show how the US military responds to natural disasters

When natural disaster strikes at home or abroad, America usually sends its military to aid in rescue and recovery. Engineers, search and rescue, and logistics specialists pour into the area to save as many people as quickly as possible.

Here are 17 photos that show what that’s like.

1. Troops are rushed to the area, usually via cargo aircraft.

Marines inside the C-130 Hercules

Photo: US Air Force Staff Sgt. Eric Harris

2. In the crucial first hours, disaster survivors can be rescued from collapsed or flooded structures. Engineers carefully shore up crumbling buildings and cut through obstacles.

Photo: US Air Force Senior Airman Tania Reid

Photo: US Air Force Senior Airman Tania Reid

3. During hurricanes and tsunamis, there’s a good chance some survivors will have been swept to sea. Trained swimmers work to extract them.

Photo: US Air Force Airman 1st Class Krystal Ardrey

Photo: US Air Force Airman 1st Class Krystal Ardrey

4. Survivors are transported to safe areas in military aircraft and vehicles.

Haiti earthquake evacuation

Photo: US Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Brandon Blackwell

5. When possible, the Navy sends its hospital ships to the disaster zone. The USNS Mercy and USNS comfort are floating hospitals with capacity for 1,000 patients each.

Photo: US Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Brandon Blackwell

Photo: US Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Brandon Blackwell

6. Field hospitals are set up to receive and treat the injured or sick after the disaster.

Photo: US Air Force Airman 1st Class Justyn M. Freeman

Photo: US Air Force Airman 1st Class Justyn M. Freeman

7. As survivors are being evacuated to care facilities, equipment, food, and other necessities surge in.

Nepal-Earthquake-disaster-relief

Photo: US Air Force Master Sgt. Roy A. Santana

8. If the local transportation network has been damaged, the U.S. military finds workarounds. Here, a group of Air Force combat controllers direct air traffic at Toussaint L’Ouverture Airport in Port-au-Prince, Haiti after the 2010 earthquake there knocked out the control tower.

Photo: US Air Force Staff Sgt. Desiree N. Palacios

Photo: US Air Force Staff Sgt. Desiree N. Palacios

9. As supplies come in, they are moved overland to shelters and distribution centers.

Photo: US Air National Guard Tech. Sgt. Jorge Intriago

Photo: US Air National Guard Tech. Sgt. Jorge Intriago

10. Sometimes, engineers have to prevent additional damage from aftershocks or continuing flooding.

Photo: US Air National Guard Tech. Sgt. Jorge Intriago

Photo: US Air National Guard Tech. Sgt. Jorge Intriago

11. The engineers can operate 24-hours-a-day to get ahead of rising water.

Photo: US Air National Guard Tech. Sgt. Jorge Intriago

Photo: US Air National Guard Tech. Sgt. Jorge Intriago

12. Sandbags and materials can be dropped into place by helicopters, vehicles, or carried in by troops.

Photo: US Air National Guard Tech. Sgt. Jorge Intriago

Photo: US Air National Guard Tech. Sgt. Jorge Intriago

13. When helicopters are used, the crew chief directs the pilots in order to get the materials in the right spot.

Photo: US Air National Guard Airman Megan Floyd

Photo: US Air National Guard Airman Megan Floyd

14. Clearing roads allows for more vehicles to move supplies and evacuees.

Photo: US Air Force Airman 1st Class Clayton Cupit

Photo: US Air Force Airman 1st Class Clayton Cupit

15. If invited by local government officials, troops will help patrol disaster areas.

Photo: US Army National Guard Sgt. Brian Calhoun

Photo: US Army National Guard Sgt. Brian Calhoun

16. As the situation begins to stabilize, the military will assist with clean up as well. Eventually, they’ll be released back to their normal missions.

Photo: US Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Stefanie Pupkiewicz

Photo: US Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Stefanie Pupkiewicz

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