These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Well, it’s about that time again. The Army has plans for another physical fitness test with events other than push-ups, sit-ups, and a two mile run. This time around, the review process seems to have lasted longer than a few weeks so it might possibly, maybe, actually happen.

The new Army Combat Readiness Test will more than likely become a thing. There will now be six events instead of the previous three. The idea behind it is that it reflects the real-world obstacles of combat.

All muscle groups will be worked out, as opposed to just the upper-body, core and cardio endurance. Equipment will now be used. Possibly gender neutral but MOS-specific scoring. And some officer who was REALLY into Crossfit is happy.

Event 1: Leg Tuck

Testing your shoulders, core, and leg endurance, the objective is to raise your knees to your elbow as many times as you can until you reach muscle failure. It simulates climbing tasks.

This event isn’t too demanding or challenging in theory. The concern is trying to keep your endurance up to the point where you can complete as many as you can without reaching complete muscle failure — you don’t want to shoot yourself in the foot for the remaining five events.

ACRT Leg Tuck

Event 2: Power Throw

Testing your upper and lower body power, the objective is to toss a 10lb medicine ball behind you as far as you can twice (with both attempts added to the closest centimeter). It simulates lifting, progressive levels of force, and uh, tossing?

Holy crap, dude. If you can’t get someone to help watch where you’re blindly throwing a 10lb ball, just do squats with the ball instead. Shy of the combat application of the ACRT, the second goal is to minimize injuries. Don’t make this event more dangerous than doing a sit-up.

ACRT Power Throw

Event 3: Trap Bar Dead-lift

Testing your lower and back strength, the objective is to dead-lift the trap bar three times with a weight you determine. It simulates a soldier’s ability to lift and carry someone on a litter or move equipment.

Remember that “minimize injury” thing from the last event? Learn how to do a proper dead-lift. No way around that. This is supposed to be less dangerous than a push-up. Even if your form is good, it would be beneficial to know your maximum dead-lift weight you can actually perform — three times — so you aren’t wasting your time (and effort) doing two, then have to bump down in weights and try three again. Work smarter not harder.

ACRT Trap Bar Deadlift

Event 4: T Push-up

Testing your upper body endurance, the objective is to successfully complete as many T Push-ups as you can before you reach muscle failure. It simulates pushing an opponent away during man-to-man contact.

It’s just like a push-up. But when you’re down, touch your chest on the ground and spread your arms. Do this until you get tired.

No health risk, but I mean, it would be funny watching someone try to skip steps to be fast and face-plant into the ground. Please take photos to laugh at the poor SOB.

ACRT T pushup

Event 5: Shuttle Sprint-Drag-Carry

Testing your muscular strength, anarobic capacity, and ability to exert effort at high intensity for brief moments, the object is to lay prone. On the command “Go!” sprint 25m down and 25 back. Pick up the straps to a 100lb sled and drag it 25m down and back. Sprint the 25m down and back again. Grab two 40lb kettlebells and run the 25m down and back. Then finish the event sprinting again.

So it’s sprint, sled, sprint, kettlebells, and sprint. No real way to prepare sprinting with 40lb kettlebells without just sprinting with 40lbs kettlebells.

ACRT Shuttle sprint drag carry

Event 6: 2-Mile Run

Testing your cardio-respiratory endurance, the objective is to run two miles — and just like before, you’re still graded on how fast you finish it. It simulates a soldier’s ability to execute long distance ruck marches  and to run two miles?

And the new fitness test still involves the run. Only thing different is the grading. So yeah. Get some.

ACRT 2 Mile Run

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