These are the Presidential traditions around the Army-Navy game

Throughout the years, the meeting between the two largest rivals in college football has been known as “The President’s Game” because of how intertwined the game is with the Commander-in-Chief.

Many of the traditions surrounding the game — and perhaps the game itself — are owed to President Theodore Roosevelt. In 1893, after first four Army-Navy games, football was deemed “too unsafe” by President Grover Cleveland and future games were prohibited. After all, players were bloodied, fights broke out between fans, and, at one point, an Army General and Navy Admiral nearly dueled to the death over a game.

It wasn’t until 1897 that President Roosevelt — undeniably the manliest president America has ever seen — wrote a letter urging the reinstatement of the game. In 1899, it returned, but was as dangerous as ever. Later, President Roosevelt also saw to revamping the rules of the game. He made sure pads and gear were worn, adding safety but maintaining the sport’s intensity. Roosevelt attended the game in 1901 and laid down traditions for future presidents to emulate.

Roosevelt at army navy game

Roosevelt crossing the field, sparking a new tradition. (Image via Library of Congress)

Presidential Attendance

To date, only nine sitting presidents have attended the game: Roosevelt, Wilson, Coolidge, Truman, Kennedy, Ford, Clinton, George W. Bush, and Obama. Last year, then President-elect Donald Trump attended, making him the only President-elect to watch the game in person. President Truman holds the record at seven games, followed by President George W. Bush at three. Presidents that attend are usually asked to perform the coin toss at the start of the game.

Bush also started the tradition of giving both teams a pep talk before the game. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tommy Gilligan)

Bush also started the tradition of giving both teams a pep talk before the game. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tommy Gilligan)

President Eisenhower was the only President to ever play in the game, but never attend while in office. President Carter, despite having gone to the Naval Academy, never attended while in office. Between 1924 and 1945, no sitting President went to “The President’s Game.”

There was another gap in attendance starting in 1963, when President Ford came to cheer for both teams on for the 75th anniversary of the rivalry, and 1995. Since then, Presidents have made an appearance regularly.

Kennedy at AN Game

Kennedy was a major fan of the game, which is why the game was played just two weeks after his death. The almost 28 year gap was because of Presidential safety concerns. (Image via Kennedy Library)

Switching Sides

Another tradition started by President Roosevelt is walking across the field at half-time. This symbolic gesture shows good will and faith between both teams and the President. Even Presidents who had served in the Navy or Army, like Kennedy and Ford respectively, put their histories aside for the sake of tradition (although they both started on their service’s side).

The only President to not do this was the seven-time attendee Truman, who stayed comfortably on one side. Don’t worry, he switched sides for the next game.

President Truman Army-Navy game

You can’t fault Truman for sticking to one side. He DID attend more games than any other President. (Image via Truman Library)

TOP ARTICLES
7 things troops do on deployments that they won't admit to

Deployment downtime is basically just all of us doing dumb stuff that would make our grandmas question their "Support the Troops" bumper sticker.

5 things enlisted troops love but officers hate

Most officers want their troops to abide by all the rules while the members of the E-4 mafia just want to push the envelope as often as possible.

North Korea may now have a biological weapons program

U.S. intelligence officials sent a report to Congress warning that secret work was under way in North Korea on a biological weapon. Here's what we know.

This airman gave his life to protect his daughter

This airman, husband, and father died protecting his 5 year old daughter. Surrounding her body with his, he took the brunt of a falling building.

5 momentous military events that happened on Christmas

It's the most wonderful time of the year. Sometimes. Like in 1914 when British, German and French troops paused the war to observe the religious holiday.

What would happen if the Hanukkah story took place today

This is what a hypothetical Maccabee battle would look like with modern technology, forces, and funds behind it. Happy Hanukkah, everyone.

That time a Soviet citizen defected across the Korean DMZ

A Soviet citizen trying to defect sparked one of the biggest exchanges of gunfire between UN and North Korean forces at the DMZ since the Korean War.

This is how Navy SEALs swim out of a submerged submarine

Ever wonder how Navy SEALs get off of a submarine? This video'll show you all the specialized techniques used to manage underwater pressure.

Veterans unload on Roy Moore's comment about fighting in a foxhole

Roy Moore, so hated by his fellow soldiers in Vietnam that he feared they'd kill him with a grenade, got schooled on foxholes after distasteful comment.

China's new stealth fighter may be an enormous threat to the US

China's Chengdu J-20 is the first stealth jet produced by anyone other than the U.S. The jet, not fully stealth, is a mystery to some military planners.