This combat medic saved lives in the field despite his immobilized legs

Drafted in the Army in 1967, Clarence Sasser trained as a combat medic before heading to Vietnam with the Army’s 9th Infantry Division.

As the first helicopters were inserting in the Mekong Delta for a reconnaissance mission, the enemy forces began to engage the incoming aircraft.

One of the helos suffered a direct hit and crashed into the rice patties. Soon after Clarence’s chopper landed, he quickly exited the bird and dashed toward the downed craft — taking a grazed bullet to his leg.

“With the helicopter down, there wasn’t another choice but to go in,” Clarence recalls.

Related: This drill sergeant saved 8 soldiers in the most heroic way

While under a curtain of gunfire, the young combat medic rushed to aid those who called out his name in pain.

After successfully rendering care on multiple troops, an enemy mortar round landed just shy of his position — spraying his back with hot shrapnel.

Clarence Sasser - MOH - US Army

Medal of Honor recipient Clarence Sasser, speaks to attendees at the Living Legends Banquet Museum at the Sheppard AFB Community Center. (Source: U.S. Air Force photo/Mike Litteken)

To combat the heavy amount of incoming fire, Clarence crawled to each man who called out for his aid.

“They see your bag, they know you’re a medic,” Clarence explains. “You kill a medic, a lot of people will probably die.”

As he moved from patient to patient, Clarence was hit by machine-gun fire in both of his legs — nearly causing him to become immobile. The strong-willed medic refused medical attention and continued with his mission — to search and save his brother’s lives.

Clarence Sasser - MOH - US Army

Clarence Sasser at his MOH ceremony.

Clarence and his unit spent the remainder of the day fighting in the rice patty. After witnessing several hours of intense firefights, Clarence and his brothers were evacuated the area.

Also Read: A Navy SEAL describes what it’s like to receive the MoH

After recovering from his wounds at the dispensary, Clarence was notified that he was to receive the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions in combat.

President Richard Nixon awarded Clarence at the White House on March 7, 1969.

“I just did my job,” Clarence humbly states.

Check out Medal of Honor Book‘s video below to hear Clarence’s story from the man himself.

Medal of Honor Book, YouTube

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