The American caught crossing the DMZ wanted to be a negotiator

The 58 year-old US citizen who attempted to cross the demilitarized border zone between North and South Korea into the communist dictatorship had political motivations and wanted to help Pyongyang and Washington negotiate.

The man, who has not yet been named, has been detained by the South Korean government and now will be deported, according to NK News.

The man crossed “with the judgment that he could contribute to the situation in the North,” Suh Wook, Chief Director of Operations at the South Korean Joint Chiefs of Staff, told NK News.

Korean Demilitarized Zone. ROK and US Soldiers at Observation Post Ouellette, South Korea. Army Photo by Edward N. Johnson.

Korean Demilitarized Zone. ROK and US Soldiers at Observation Post Ouellette, South Korea. Army Photo by Edward N. Johnson.

The man apparently thought he could help along the peace process between the US and North Korea, two nations still technically at war, authorities told NK News.

Related: These ax murders along the DMZ almost started another Korean War

The man had planned his defection on the internet and intended to simply walk across the ceasefire line, which is illegal under South Korean law. Most who enter or exit North Korea choose to do so through the country’s border with China, rather than crossing one of the most heavily guarded and militarized zones on Earth.

On Nov. 14, the same day the US man attempted his crossing, a North Korean soldier defected to the South while fleeing from a hail of gunfire and being shot five times. The North Korean is being treated for his injuries in South Korea.

TOP ARTICLES
A box of gear from Alpha Outpost will make you want to kick some ass

CEO Daniel Alarik has made the domination of crowded fields into an art form. His latest venture, a tactical subscription box company, is the Mona Lisa.

How a Christmas-gift-to-be turned into a booming vet-owned business

Looking for the perfect gift for the salty veteran in your life and fast running out of ideas? Put those 72 koozies down and check out Medals of America.

This wounded warrior is turning steel into gold in Alabama

Colin Wayne went from an Army National Guardsman to a fitness model to...a steel worker? Wayne’s company, Redline Steel, creates art from steel.

3 leadership lessons that will take you from the battlefield to the boardroom

Col. Ted Studdard never imagined he'd have a 25-year career in the Marines, but he's got some pro tips to share now that he's a bonafide "mustang."

How a soldier went to war with his unique brand of Cuban-style cigars

Blanco Cigar, a company built and run by a first generation American with Cuban roots, has its ups and downs, but generated over a million dollars in 2017.

6 crazy things actually found in boot camp amnesty boxes

Upon arriving at boot camp, the staff gives newbies a chance to toss prohibited items into the "amnesty box." Want to know what's inside?

Why your next battle buddy might be a robot armed with a railgun

The Army has quite a Christmas wishlist for Uncle Sam Claus, and it's filled with all kinds of goodies like robots, light tanks, and lasers.

Here's why some Corpsmen are considered Marines, and some aren't

A sailor earning respect from a Marine is a tough challenge. It's a special privilege to have a Marine tell you happy birthday each Nov. 10.

Here are the changes to the combat uniform the Army is testing right now

The Army will be testing new uniforms and boots beginning in 2018, better suited for hotter environments. Here's what's different about them.

The Navy will pump out more attack subs to counter Russia and China

The Navy had previously decided to slow production of Virginia-Class submarines, but has now decided to produce more in order to keep up with rivals.