8 amazing photos comparing today's Pearl Harbor to the day of the attack

On December 7, 1941, the US naval fleet stationed at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, suffered a devastating attack from the air and sea.

The Japanese assault began around 8 a.m., resulting in the deaths of 2,403 Americans, numerous injuries, and the sinking of four battleships, and damage to many more.

Surprised U.S. service members who normally would have slept in on that Sunday morning or enjoyed some recreation found themselves fighting for their lives.

See More: Unforgettable photos from the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor

In 2013, the U.S. Navy remembered the “day of infamy” with a series of photo illustrations overlaying scenes from that horrifying date with present-day photos.

Now, 76 years after the attack, here’s what Pearl Harbor looked like then and now:

8. Defenders on Ford Island watch for planes during the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.

Defenders on Ford Island watch for planes during the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. The combined image contains photographs taken during the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and the same present day location as the event. (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)

(U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan)

7. The battleship USS California (BB 44) burns in the foreground as the battleship USS Arizona (BB 39) burns in the background after the initial attack on Pearl Harbor.

The battleship USS California (BB 44) burns in the foreground as the battleship USS Arizona (BB 39) burns in the background after the initial attack on Pearl Harbor. The combined image contains photographs taken during the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and the same present day location as the event. (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)

(U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan)

6. Defenders on Ford Island watch for planes during the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.

Defenders on Ford Island watch for planes during the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. The combined image contains photographs taken during the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and the same present day location as the event. (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)

(U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan)

5. Hangar 6 on Ford Island stands badly damaged after the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Hangar 6 on Ford Island stands badly damaged after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The combined image contains photographs taken during the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and the same present day location as the event. (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)

(U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan)

4. A view of the historic Ford Island control tower: then and now. The tower was once used to guide airplanes at the airfield on the island and will now be used as an aviation library.

A view of the historic Ford Island control tower: then and now. The tower was once used to guide airpanes at the airfield on the island and will now be used as an aviation library. The combined image contains photographs taken in 1941 and the same present day location. (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)

(U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan)

3. The battleship USS Arizona (BB 39) burns in the background during the attack on Pearl Harbor as viewed from Ford Island.

The battleship USS Arizona (BB 39) burns in the background during the attack on Pearl Harbor as viewed from Ford Island. The combined image contains photographs taken during the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and the same present day location as the event. (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)

(U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan)

2. The Mahan-class destroyer USS Shaw (DD 373) explodes in the background after the attack on Pearl Harbor.

The Mahan-class destroyer USS Shaw (DD 373) explodes in the background after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The combined image contains photographs taken during the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and the same present day location as the event. (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)

(U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan)

1. Sailors on Ford Island look on as the Mahan-class destroyer USS Shaw (DD 373) explodes in the background after the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Sailors on Ford Island look on as the Mahan-class destroyer USS Shaw (DD 373) explodes in the background after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The combined image contains photographs taken during the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and the same present day location as the event. (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan/Released)

(U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Diana Quinlan)

TOP ARTICLES
This Army veteran's book focuses on the stories of the 'Frontline Generation'

Eastman's goal was to capture the lessons she learned that represents the best of what it means to be American — the 1% of the population in the military.

Nigeria will spend a billion dollars to fight Boko Haram

Boko Haram, once one of the most feared groups in Africa, is still a problem. Nigeria, however, has decided they aren't putting up with them anymore.

ISIS may have obtained anti-tank missiles from the CIA

Somehow, ISIS has gotten a hold of weapons purchased by the CIA and Saudi Arabia and dispersed, without permission from either, to allied fighters.

How the Army plans to counter massive drone attacks

The United States military is experiencing more and more drone attacks in combat zones, and they have a plan to start shooting them down faster.

Marines want to swarm enemy defenses with hundreds of small boats

It looks like the Marine Corps is ready to get their own boats instead of borrowing them from the Navy all the time. Is this the end of water taxis?

This bearded Marine brings joy to the Corps

He's making a gear list. He's checking it twice. Gonna find out who's boot or grunt. Gunny Clause is coming on base. So stand at ease, kiddos.

This new device helps amputees manage phantom limb pain

Amira Idris designed a device helps amputees experiencing the phenomenon known as phantom limb pain (PLP) — and now she's giving the device to vets.

5 stories you may have missed for the week of December 16th

With everything going on in the world, it's difficult to keep track of every story that pops up. Check the stories you may have missed this week.

This is why the U.S.military uses 5.56mm ammo instead of 7.62mm

A common debate among gun enthusiasts revolves around why the U.S. chose to implement the 5.56mm N.A.T.O. round into service instead of the 7.62mm.

Combat Flip Flops are all about freedom — and not just for your feet

Buy a comfy pair of flip flops — put Afghanistan to work. Buy your lady a sarong — put an Afghan girl through school. This is global democracy, step two.