Veterans

7 pieces of gear vets will still use in the civilian world

The Central Issuing Facility loans plenty of great and not-so-great items to the troops. Many pieces of gear, like the load-bearing vest and the elbow pads, were tossed back with no remorse, but others are just too damn useful to part with.

Whether they're listed as expendable, given to the troops with no intention of reclamation, or they're swapped with a second one bought at the surplus store off-installation, troops just can't part with these things.


1. Assault pack

Go to any college campus in America and within ten seconds, you'll identify who's using the GI Bill to pay for tuition. Rarely will a vet switch back to a civilian backpack after using the assault pack.

It's much sturdier than anything you can find in the back-to-school section and it's free, so... why not?

The MOLLE straps let you know that it's legit — not some imitation.

(Photo by Sgt. Patrick Eakin)

2. Multi-tool

Most civilians will stockpile an entire drawer full of miscellaneous tools. Veterans who were issued a multi-tool will just use the one.

Sure, civilians can get their own versions, but there's just something badass about fixing stuff around the house with a Gerber that has a front sight post adjuster.

Even if vets have the options, they'll only use the multi-tool.

(Photo by Pedro Vera)

3. Duffel bags

Throughout a troop's career, they sign off a lot of junk that's never going to be touched again — even after they clear CIF for the last time. This leads to every veteran owning their very own "duffel bag full of crap."

The bag may get re-purposed for storing other things, but nine times out of ten, it's still full of the same crap that was stuffed in there years ago.

Basically what every veteran's closet looks like.

(Photo by Mike Kaplan)

4. E-tool

Standard shovels are far too bulky to keep around. Collapsing an entrenching tool and tossing it in the trunk is kind of necessary if you live in a state that gets terrible snowfall.

Even if you're not using it to get your car out of a snowbank because you're too damn proud to call someone for help and you want to prove to yourself that you're still a competent survivor and driver, it still makes for a great way to dig holes at a moment's notice.

I'm totally not talking about myself... Totally.

(Photo by Lance Cpl. Taylor Newman)

5. Thermals

Troops don't often get the chance to wear their thermals while in the military without enduring ridicule from their peers. The moment they get out, they finally have the opporunity.

The same thermals can be spotted on both veterans who are out hunting and veterans that just don't feel like wearing civilian pajamas.

Just sayin'. After people stop mocking you for wearing snivel gear, your resistance to the weather goes down — fast.

(Photo by Airman Areca T. Bell)

6. Poncho liner

After veterans get out, they'll be cuddling on the couch with their significant other, watching TV while draped in some regular old throw blanket. But it just isn't the same. It's not their poncho liner or, as it's more affectionately known, their woobie.

That throw blanket from Bed, Bath, and Beyond didn't deploy with them. That throw blanket wasn't their only companion in the bizarrely cold desert nights. That throw blanket wasn't the only piece of military gear that was fielded with the express intention of being used for comfort.

No, only the woobie holds that special place in the hearts of younger veterans.

Doesn't matter if our older brothers hate it. We don't mind be hated and comfortable.

(Photo by Spc. Michael Sharp)

7. P-38 can openers

These items aren't really ranked in any particular order. But if they were, the can opener would certainly top the list. Many troops swear that their beloved woobie is the most cherished, but older generations of veterans will confess a deep love for their can opener.

The greatest ten-cent beer opener ever!

(Courtesy photo)