MIGHTY GAMING
Kevin Webb

This highly anticipated PlayStation 4 game is confusing critics

(Kojima Productions)

Kojima Production's "Death Stranding" has all the makings of a video game blockbuster. It's an experience three years in the making, the product of a visionary director launching a new franchise from an independent studio.

But after three years of mounting anticipation, it's still not totally clear what players can expect from "Death Stranding." Sony gave critics an early chance to dive in and see what "Death Stranding" is about, and the reviews have brought back rather mixed opinions.

There's no question "Death Stranding" is a clear departure from Director Hideo Kojima's last game, "Metal Gear Solid V." While "Metal Gear Solid" is a military-focused franchise starring a super soldier, "Death Stranding" puts you in control of a lone deliveryman in a desolate, post-apocalyptic that's wide open for exploration.


Norman Reedus of "The Walking Dead" plays the game's protagonist, and a handful of recognizable actors offer photo-realistic performances for the game's cinematic cut scenes. The story wasn't particularly celebrated among reviewers, though some said the cutscenes were well-acted.

Reviewers ultimately found that the experience would vary depending on the player, since "Death Stranding" takes dozens of hours to complete. Critics noted that the game's first 10 hours can be particularly challenging or outright boring depending on your play-style, but the game changes rather dramatically after the long introduction.

Last year's best-selling game, "Red Dead Redemption 2," had a similar reception — the game's campaign took 40 or more hours to complete and left reviewers with a mixed impression of the game's massive open world. "Red Dead Redemption 2" was still well received by fans for its immersive gameplay and thoughtful storytelling.

Here's what critics are saying about "Death Stranding" so far:

The visuals of "Death Stranding" are impressive by any standard.

("Death Stranding"/Kojima Productions)

"So much work has been poured into every inch of every model and it's almost unbelievable to see this much detail - even in an era where most games already feature highly detailed characters. Put simply, the bar has been raised." — John Linneman, Digital Foundry

'Death Stranding' is more about survival and exploration than action and combat.

("Death Stranding"/Kojima Productions)

"There's no automatic parkour or physics-defying cliff climbing here. Every step I take needs to be intentional, or I might end up taking a serious tumble. When I overload my pack I have to use the left and right triggers to balance my weight, or else I risk falling over, damaging my goods.

It's equally engaging and frustrating as I topple over after twisting my ankle, forcing myself to restack all my belongings. Death Stranding is a walking simulator in the truest sense." — Russ Frushtick

Exploring doesn't mean you'll always be alone though.

("Death Stranding" Kojima Productions)

"Violence is a last resort, and 'Death Stranding' is best experienced in a careful and stealthy fashion, but when the time comes for the silence to break and explosions to ring out, it's powerful." — Heather Alexandra, Kotaku

"Death Stranding" is a long game that requires a personal investment from its players.

("Death Stranding"/Kojima Productions)

"It's not a game that makes itself easy to enjoy. There are few concessions for uninterested players. It's ponderously slow, particularly in the early chapters, which largely consist of delivering packages over staggering distances. Early conversations are filled with phrases and words that will be incomprehensible to the uninitiated — and, honestly, much of it remains a mystery after the credits roll." — Andrew Webster, The Verge

'Death Stranding' left many critics excited for the game's release so they could compare their experiences with other players'.

("Death Stranding"/Kojima Productions)

"I came away from the game exhilarated, confused and wanting to find others who have played it not only to put together the missing pieces but to commiserate about the experience. In a clever meta twist, Kojima has created a game that begs for a larger discourse, a connection for all those who have played it to share." — Kahlief Adams, The Hollywood Reporter

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.