MIGHTY GAMING

​The best military games we played at gamescom and PAX West

We got our hands on some of the most exciting titles on the showroom floor at gamescom '18 and PAX West 2018.

In the summer, gamescom and PAX West bring out the best in gaming announcements as developers and publishers get the hype trains rolling right into the holiday season. This year was no exception. There are a lot of great games on the horizon, but this year, we've got our eyes glued on three shooter titles specifically.

Here are the games, in no particular order, that await your itchy trigger finger.


'Metro: Exodus' (PS4/XBO/PC)

(Deep Silver)

I'll admit, getting some time with Metro: Exodus at gamescom was my first hands-on experience with the lauded series, but it wasn't my first rodeo in the virtual apocalypse. Despite this minor detail, I was able to jump right in and start exploring the newest title set in a grim future.

It was explained to me that Exodus moves the Metro series away from its traditional, predominantly underground setting into a more balanced mixture of surface and subterranean exploration. The demo environment that I explored was well designed, rich with details to remind players they're playing a post-apocalyptic RPG. Hidden in the environment (and on corpses) are materials you can use to craft a variety of helpful consumables. One of the coolest features put on display was the ability to customize weapons to fit different situations.

Combat was smooth and accommodates a variety of different gameplay styles. Instead of stealthily picking off my opponents, I tend to lean toward going full Rambo on every enemy in sight, but both approaches seem to get the job done. After a quick developer assist (I explored a little too much and got lost — did I mention how great the environments are?), I dispatched the demo's boss mob by spending all of my ammo and finishing it off with a very satisfying melee strike.

Exodus seems like a perfect fit for fans of Bioshock, Dead Space, Far Cry, and other shooter RPGs.

'World War 3' (PC)

(The Farm 51)

World War 3 is an upcoming Battlefield-like multiplayer shooter developed and published by The Farm 51, a small indie studio based in Poland. While WW3 is themed around a theoretical conflict, it's based on real-world tensions in Eastern Europe.

Gameplay is straightforward enough, but fine-tuned. There's a good balance of combat classes, weapons, consumables — everything you've come to expect from a modern shooter. What stands out about this game, however, is that nearly everything is customizable and the array of selections is huge. Configure your own load out using everything from dozens of different types of head accessories to a variety of mounted vehicle weapons. With a little sleuthing, I even found that one of the more creative developers snuck a nuclear warhead into the mix — just for fun.

The developers on the floor reiterated several times that everything in their game (well, maybe not the nuke) will be unlockable through playing and not microtransactions. While it seems a little unfair to compare this game to AAA giants, like Battlefield, everyone I chatted with at PAX and gamescom seemed ready to draw the comparison. Regardless of whether the title can measure up to multi-million dollar blockbusters, the best part about this game is the indie price. Early access opens up for PC gamers on Steam later this year and gamers can expect to drop between $25 and $40 to join in on the international conflict.

'Battlefield V' (PS4/XBO/PC)

(EA DICE)

Speaking of AAA titles, World War II is back with EA's latest title, Battlefield V. EA DICE, longtime developers of the Battlefield series, is hoping to provide a vastly new and improved experience over their original title, Battlefield 1942, which celebrated its 16th birthday this week.

This launch comes on the heels of EA trying to recover from bad publicity stemming from the overwhelmingly pay-to-win gameplay that shipped with Star Wars Battlefront II. It seems EA has learned a little bit from their last release as they've made it a point to announce that Battlefield V will not feature any loot boxes or other forms of game-altering monetization. This statement may help soothe the ruffled feathers of the recently upset playerbase, but it also leaves the door wide open for DLCs and other types of traditional paid content.

During my brief time with the game, there's no question that it's a solid tribute to previous games in the series but, at the same time, there haven't been any groundbreaking changes made. This fact didn't seem to matter much for the masses of gamescom attendees who happily lined up and waited for up to 5 hours just play a single match. That being said, there's a lot left to be announced and much of the game's content is still hidden away, including the new, not-yet-demoed "Battlefield Royale" mode and the single-player campaign.

They say you shouldn't fix what isn't broken — and there are a lot of people out there just waiting for their next Battlefield fix, which they'll get on November 20, 2018.