MIGHTY FIT

Do you need a Drill Instructor in your civilian life?

Photo by Lance Cpl. Roxanna Gonzalez

Remember your initial indoc school to the military? I do: It was hot and heavy, and not in a good way, like at a rave or water park. You were asked in a short period of time to learn the entire guiding doctrine of your service of choice, so much so that you could easily fold into the operational forces upon completion of the school.

That is no small task.

How was this accomplished? We weren't given textbooks and told to read. We weren't even put into classes and told to take notes. Nope.


I'm just walking bro, no need to yell.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class William Blankenship/Released)

We were taken under the wing of professionals who have already lived and breathed that which we were about to undertake.

I fully understand that that is a rose-colored-glasses approach toward the DI, MTI, RDC, or Drill Sergeant that you still have nightmares about. Hear me out though: an argument can be made that an instructor, who I'll affectionately refer to as a "coach" from now on, is the one thing standing between you and your personal and professional goals.

The research

He wants you to hate him. It's his coaching style.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)

The body of literature on the topic of coaching is dense and complicated, but suffice it to say that the question is not if a coach is effective. It's how can coaches be most effective.

Two of the main factors discussed are attitude and control.

The attitude evoked by the person who is teaching you dictates how well you perform. You and your coach need to be on the same page. In your basic training, your "coach" did this whether you realized it or not. It was most likely in an "us vs. them" approach. Meaning your instructor made you want to prove him or her wrong. The dirty secret is that they wanted you to prove them wrong as well. #reversepsychology.

Control is simple. The person learning needs to have some sense of control over their outcome. In the beginning of your schoolhouse, undoubtedly you had little to no control. Over time, you were given choices and tasks that directly impacted whether or not you chose to be successful.

These are the fundamentals of great coaching in a high volume way.

Civilian life

Civilian life has its pitfalls too. Don't wait until it feels like its too late.

(Photo by Campaign Creators on Unsplash)

The assumption of a coach is that you are going to get better, and faster than you would with no one helping. Eventually, you would have figured out the rules of the military well enough to "graduate" to the active forces, but it would not have been as cleanly or efficiently as it was with the guiding force of your instructor.

It's quite common for former service members to decide they can do everything alone upon separation. That's a mistake. We assume that we are now the commander of our own lives until we eventually hit a wall. Then we start looking for guidance.

Don't wait for that moment.

"No man is an island..." -John Donne

Pro athletes know this truth. They can't do it alone.

(Photo by Xuan Nguyen on Unsplash)

If you want to be an entrepreneur, find someone who has done it and learn from them. They will keep you from falling into all the typical pitfalls.

If you want to stay home and raise a family, read from the best and learn from your friends and family that have the types of children you want.

If you wanna get in killer shape, find someone who makes that happen for people.

Don't waste your time.

You are always in the basic training of something.

Don't spend more time on Parris Island getting eaten by sand fleas than necessary. Find and follow the coach that will lead you past your goal.

Tips for finding a keeper

How would he know where to crawl if it wasn't for explicit guidance?

(Photo by David Dismukes)

For many service members, the whole reason they get out is because they are sick of other people telling them what to do.

Now you have the choice as to what type of person you want to get your guidance from. If you don't like the volatile gunny with bad breath and a worse temper, you don't need to work with him anymore. Here are five things to look for in your coach of choice for any endeavor you may have.

This kid knows what's up. What's his economy of force coach?

(Source: pixabay.com)

  1. Attitude: Find someone who has a similar attitude towards your goal that you have or hope to develop.
  2. Control: Look for someone who allows you to maintain control over your life. Someone that guides instead of mandates.
  3. Save time: The whole purpose is to find someone who gets you where you want to get faster with less time wasted. Don't spend more time digging a hole than is necessary.
  4. Feel happier: Happiness is subjective. You need not be smiling the entire time. You simply want to feel like you are making progress that you can be proud of.
  5. Find your economy of force: A great coach will show you where to employ the bulk of your effort and show you what tasks and practices you should approach with a minimum effective dose mentality.