MIGHTY MILSPOUSE

Army wife competes on NBC’s ‘The Titan Games’

Crystal Kupper

When a locked-down America tunes into the May 25 premiere of NBC's "The Titan Games", sports-starved viewers may notice a familiar face competing for the title and $100,000 grand prize: Chantae McMillan Langhorst, the track and field Olympian and nude high-jumper for The BODY Issue of ESPN The Magazine.

"One of the biggest reasons I wanted to do "The Titan Games" was its challenges that I have never faced before and will never face again," McMillan said. "I'm doing obstacles on the show that are strength and cardio all at one time. Each event is over in five minutes, but you're so fatigued afterward."



The 32-year-old from Rolla, Missouri knows all about pushing through fatigue. McMillan is not only an elite athlete, but an Army wife to Warrant Officer 1 Devon Langhorst, a helicopter pilot stationed at Fort Rucker, Alabama and mom to 18-month-old Otto. She is also the daughter of two career soldiers.

McMillan competed in the 2012 Olympics in London as a heptathlete and was training for the 2020 Olympic Trials as a javelin thrower when the coronavirus pandemic caused mass cancellations of sporting events. After competing in one track meet in March, organizers of future meets canceled their competitions.

At first, McMillan was unruffled.

"I thought, okay, my next meet will be in May, then trials in June," she said.

The Tokyo Olympics and its trials were postponed until 2021. The initial disappointment turned out to be a "blessing in disguise," she says.

"I was like, 'Alright, let's go,'" McMillan said. "It takes a lot of weight off my shoulders, because from March to June I didn't know if I could be where I wanted to be, so I was kind of stressed out."

McMillan lost her 64-year-old father in 2015 to appendectomy complications, right before failing to qualify for the 2016 Olympic games. She bounced back, becoming an Army wife and mom in 2018 and switching from heptathlon to javelin, one of her strongest events.

She's still aiming for Olympic glory — just a year later than originally planned. She and her coach, two-time Olympic hammer thrower Kibwe Johnson, are training her body as if she were throwing her way through a normal season.

"A couple weeks ago, coach asked me where my strength is, and I feel the strongest I've felt in years," McMillan said. "I feel very powerful. Now it's just translating onto the field. I feel so strong."

That strength has not gone unnoticed by those outside the track and field world. In November, a casting producer for "The Titan Games" asked McMillan to audition for the show's sophomore season after seeing her training photos and videos on Instagram.

McMillan auditioned alongside thousands of others to be a competitor. She succeeded and spent the first two weeks of February filming in Atlanta. Not only did she get to meet Dwayne Johnson, the show's host, McMillan also connected with plenty of fellow athletes.

"It was very amazing, being around so many people who are likeminded and striving to be the best they can," McMillan said. "It has still carried on to this day to motivate me to be better."

The show's obstacles, designed for 13 episodes with entertainment in mind, were vastly different than the pure "run-jump-throw" actions McMillan said she is used to in track and field.

"They're just weird obstacles that challenge you in ways you never thought you could be challenged," McMillan said.

This season of NBC's show pits professional titans like Super Bowl champion Victor Cruz, UFC fighter Tyron Woodley and "American Ninja Warrior" star Jessie Graff against "everyday" athletes like McMillan. Four of the 36 competitors are active-duty military members.

Viewers can expect to be surprised at who makes it to Mt. Olympus, the show's ultimate event, McMillan said.

"I think people will be able to connect with all of us, the way our stories are going to be told," she said. "It's not every day you're around motivated people like that."

Visit https://www.nbc.com/the-titan-games for information on upcoming episodes of The Titan Games.

This article originally appeared on Military Families Magazine. Follow @MilFamiliesMag on Twitter.