MIGHTY MILSPOUSE

4 benefits of being a military brat

In most cases, the term "brat" is one of a put-down. But when it comes to military affiliation, it's almost a term of endearment. Possibly an acronym dating back hundreds of years -- short for British Regiment Attached Traveler -- it's a word that refers to military children and all that comes with it: frequent moves and a military lifestyle for much, if not all, of their childhood years.


Being a brat is often a badge of honor. Here are four benefits of growing up on the move:

1. Military kids are great with change

Moving? Making new friends? Adapting to a new climate and culture? Military kids can do it all. They might not like it, but they're more than equipped to do so. Brats know how to settle in somewhere new, and how to ultimately fit in.

Kids (even adults) who have remained in one place their entire lives are lacking in these areas. Whether or not brats realize it at the time, frequent moves are creating important life skills in confidence, adaptability, social abilities, and more.

2. Military brats are more open-minded

If you've never lived anywhere new, it's hard to understand how others think, let alone put yourself in someone else's shoes. But when you've lived in different states, possibly even different countries, all before adulthood, that closed-mindedness simply doesn't exist.

Because they grew up hearing different thoughts, trying new foods, and meeting new folks, military brats automatically learn to be more well-rounded individuals.

3. They don’t focus on “stuff”

Every decluttering program can rejoice in the lack of things that come from military moves. If you don't need it, it's got to go! This is a great way for kids to avoid becoming materialistic and instead, to focus on what's important in life. With less focus on "stuff," it frees up time to look at other things -- activities, people, quality time with family, and more.

4. Brats are better communicators

Being a military brat means talking with grandma and grandpa through FaceTime. It means writing letters or sending gifts in the mail. It means learning how to talk with others from a distance. While it's not ideal having family that's so far away, one perk is that it teaches young kids to hold conversations and how to stay in touch, even from a young age.

Military brats can benefit from a lifestyle that keeps them moving. What's the biggest benefit you've seen as a family?