MIGHTY MILSPOUSE

A letter to the spouses of the mission essential personnel

Failing by definition is a weakness, especially in character. But you keep showing us that you are strong.

Dear spouses of the mission essential:

There's been so much written lately about the heroes on the front lines. The selfless men and women bravely going to their jobs to serve their country and their communities. The ones who are knowingly going to work with patients or customers who could infect them. Yes, we rightfully applaud the truck drivers hauling supplies to replenish depleted stores. We extol the cook at our favorite restaurant who keeps making meals and the employees whose tips have been practically eliminated but still run our orders out to our cars. We watch with sheer amazement and horror as our doctors, nurses and medical staff go into the line of fire lacking basic, necessary protective equipment. We honor you all. We salute you all. We love and respect and are grateful For You All.

But this letter isn't about that. Nope.


This letter is to you -- the spouses of the mission essentials.

Returning home

You are the ones left behind each morning. The ones left to deal with homeschool and meals and kids unable to play with their friends or understand their math homework that they didn't quite grasp in a packet.

You are the ones left to carry the emotional burdens of children who are frustrated at a Zoom classroom and don't understand why they can't have a sleepover or go see grandma or even play at the park. You are the ones who field countless requests for snacks, a thousand utterings of, "I need help," and even more declarations of, "I can't do this."

You put your own work on hold, your own health, your own sanity to muster one more ounce of patience, one more hug, one more deep breath, all while balancing that other nasty, invisible weight: the burden of your own anxiety. Anxious about the world. Anxious about your spouse. Anxious about their health and your health and your parents' health and your kids' health and their screen time and your elderly neighbor's health and the teachers' health and your job and your neighbor's job and the economy and your kids' education, and given your one hour of free time a week, why you suddenly identify with a character on Tiger King.

Here's the thing: It's all too much. And it's going to feel like you're failing.

Failing by definition means, "a weakness, especially in character; a shortcoming." But if we've seen anything in this time of pandemic, we've seen your strength. Your resolve. Your gracious heart. We've seen you stay home and help flatten the curve. We've seen you take on additional responsibilities so your mission essential spouse could keep being mission essential. We've seen you offer encouragement to your friends on FaceTime when you have none to give yourself. We've seen you reassure your exhausted partner that everything will be okay, all the while knowing you will lie awake in the dark in the middle of the night, the echoes of your own fears so deafening you can't fall back asleep.

We see you. You're going to be okay. Reframe your measure of success to include a bar that allows for just getting by. Find time for gratitude. Make space for prayer or meditation or simply a silence that isn't broken by fear or anxiety. We are all in this together and your best is good enough. As my seven year old reminded me yesterday, this is his first global pandemic. Ours too, bud. Ours too.