MIGHTY MILSPOUSE

Facing appointments or giving birth alone? You’ve got this.

Here's what military spouses want moms-to-be to know about facing pregnancy and delivery alone during the coronavirus outbreak

Jenny Byers, a first time mom living in San Diego at the time, laid on the hospital bed with tears streaming down her face as her son, Declan, was placed on her chest.

In what was such a joyous moment in her life, Byers wished just one thing -- that her husband could be there to witness the occasion. She turned over her shoulder as a nurse nearby held up a computer with a live FaceTime call with PJ Byers, meeting his son for the first time.


Courtesy of Jenny Byers

"That's your daddy," she said to her newborn son experiencing skin-to-skin beneath a blanket.

PJ Byers redeployed when Declan was five months old and they met for the first time face-to-face in an emotional airport family reunion.

"At first I was scared our family was being robbed of one of the most special moments of our lives," Jenny Byers told We Are The Mighty. "But I was wrong. That moment was still just as special, but in a way I wasn't expecting. Thanks to modern day technology, we got to meet our son together."

The Byers family's story is not an outlier. Being married to someone in the military often means facing many of life's challenges without your significant other and pregnancy is no exception.

"When my son was born we were at Fort Campbell, and my daughter was four," said Sophie Pappas, a journalist and Army spouse. "I ended up driving myself to the hospital while my mom from Indiana stayed with my daughter. The midwife was super amazing during my second birth. She held one of my legs up with one of her hands and with her other hand she held my iPhone so my husband could FaceTime and see everything! I will always be grateful he was able to at least watch over FaceTime."

Pappas credits the love and adrenaline running through her body for being able to deliver her baby boy without focusing on the absence of her husband.

Courtesy of Sophie Pappas

"When I was pushing, I remember laying in the hospital room at 8-centimeters dilated, totally alone," she shared. "My water broke and I started to push right then and there with not even a nurse around. I didn't know how to call anyone in, so I just started doing it alone. Looking back, that was one of the most amazing moments of my life. The strength that your body has to just do what it needs to do is incredible."

While military spouses facing pregnancy alone and delivery without their spouse is not new, this is an unprecedented situation for many pregnant civilians as the coronavirus outbreak continues.

Heading to appointments without spousal support or delivering a new baby in a plan that looks different than it did six months ago is a scary realization that is top-of-mind for many moms-to-be.

Here is what military spouses who were pregnant and/or delivered alone want to share with expectant moms:

"I wish I trusted in myself a little more that I was capable and strong enough to do it alone and that it wouldn't be forever. I also talked to my OB/GYN who knew about my experience and would let me videotape parts of the appointment such as ultrasounds. She was also really good about giving me lots of US pictures that I could send to my husband." - Maureen Hannan Tufte

"I would tell them to be sure and ask for help when they need it. I was pretty stubborn about trying to do it all on my own, but when I did have help, I would realize how much I really needed it. Maybe find pregnancy groups (fitness or otherwise) to get involved in. Maybe they'll find a kindred spirit who is going through the same thing? I would tell them that they can get through this." - Julie Estrella

"I think the biggest thing with any pregnancy is that whether a national pandemic or a deployment or any event gets in the way, you're going to have this 'idea' of exactly how you want things to go or you think things will go. I can 10000% guarantee that no pregnancy has ever turned out exactly like the mom and dad to be imagined, it's just life. The sooner you adjust to the idea that things may change or unexpected events may occur, the better your anxiety and nerves will be and the less it will sting when that inevitable curveball comes your way." - Kati Simmons

"It's scary to be pregnant by yourself, especially during a first pregnancy. But the baby will keep growing no matter whether or not your partner is available. All you can do is take care of yourself and try not to stress out. Then be sure to Reach out to friends, call family, do what you can to find support because there are definitely people who are willing to help." - Julie Yaste

"What brought me comfort before giving birth without my husband was hearing about other women who had labored alone before me. Knowing I wasn't the only one to ever face this situation gave me every affirmation I needed, to know I was going to be okay." - Jenny Byers

"I would tell someone to not get hung up on who won't be there, think about who will. You and your baby! Embrace these moments to bond and build a connection. Dwelling on the sadness of your spouse not being there takes away from the joy." - Kelsey Bucci

"We are capable and able to do hard things. It will be ok. Not having your spouse around for the birth is really hard. But, it will be ok. Lots of pictures and FaceTime. We are lucky to live in a land of technology." - Alana Steppe

"Know it's only temporary and the feeling of seeing your husband or spouse with your baby will be the most amazing feeling and make it all worth it." - Emily Stewart

Courtesy of Kelly Callahan

"You are stronger than you know, and while the situation may not look anything like what you pictured, it is amazing what our mind and body will do (and do well) when we are faced with the challenge of bringing a new life into the world. What I realize now that we are on the other side of it, is that this situation is a small piece of our story and it's a beautiful one. Lucy is in kindergarten now and I've heard her share with classmates and teachers more than once that her daddy could not be there when she was born, so she got to meet him on the computer, because he was fighting bad guys in other places. It all adds to who we are and how we are shaped. I would also add that the nurses and doctor who helped me deliver stepped up in ways I never could have imagined. They made sure the technology was just right so that my husband was included and included him in the conversations. They supported me like we had known each other for years and cried with me when she was born. The medical community is amazing and will not let anyone feel alone." - Kelly Callahan

A spouse who wished to remain anonymous gave sage advice for expectant moms from the perspective of both a mom of six and labor and delivery nurse of ten years:

"I can confidently tell you that now, more than ever, your nurses are ready to be your doula, photographer and friend," she shared. "You will not be left alone. You will have our entire team here to celebrate with you on your special day."