MIGHTY MILSPOUSE

See Rosie run! Military spouses run for elected office

Jennifer Barnhill

(Military Families Magazine)

There has never been an active-duty military spouse elected to Congress. As overall military representation has fallen by roughly 20% over the past 60 years, spouses of service members are seeking to close the military-civilian representation gap.

Military Families Magazine spoke to three military spouses running for elected office in 2020 to see what led them to take the leap from concerned citizen to candidate.


First active-duty spouse in Congress? 

If elected in November, Lindsey Simmons, a candidate for Missouri's 4th Congressional District, would be the first active-duty military spouse elected to Congress. To put that in context there are currently 535 representatives in the 116th Congress. Since the election of the first female representative in 1917 there have been 51 sessions of Congress and thousands of opportunities to elect an active-duty military spouse.

Army spouse Lindsey Simmons is running for Missouri's 4th Congressional District. Her political journey began when she started working with and for veterans in her community, trying to close the civilian-military representation gap. (Military Families Magazine)

Like many military spouses, Simmons' journey into public service started through her advocacy for military families, with a desire to improve schools and health care access.

"I recognized that There was a huge gap between military families and civilian families," Simmons said. "And so much of the policies coming down from Washington and how they were affecting our families never made the news."

Representation gap

On the surface, the military population seems diverse, with increased participation from women and minorities. However, those who join the military are more likely to come from military families. With the overall size of the military in decline, the average citizen's connection to someone in the military has dropped. Seventy-nine percent of baby boomers have a military connection as compared to only 33% of millennials.

If military families choose not to participate in a "second service" by running for elected office, then their voices and experiences are left out of the political process, widening the civilian-military representation gap.

Simmons is running for Missouri's 4th Congressional District. Her political campaign was born out of her concern for her communities' access to healthcare and other services. (Military Families Magazine)

With fewer experienced representatives in Congress, "their [politicians'] only notion of the military is what they see," Simmons said. "And often the liaisons that DOD sends are going to be higher-ranking officers."

Because military spouses are not subject to DOD Directive 1344.10 — the regulation that prevents active-duty service members from engaging in politics — there is no reason they cannot attempt to close the gap. According to Sarah Streyder, Director of the Secure Families Initiative and active-duty Air Force spouse, there is a lack of clarity surrounding what level of political engagement is acceptable for military families. Military programming is "missing a call to public sector engagement," Streyder said. There are no reasons spouses should not "lobby our representatives, by voting, by speaking up in order to be a more active part of the conversations that drive war and peace."

Serve where you want to see change

Not everyone feels called to serve in Congress, but their participation is no less valuable. Navy spouse Alexia Palacios-Peters is running for the school board in Coronado, California. Things shifted for Palacios-Peters during a parent-teacher conference.

Coronado, California School Board candidate and Navy spouse Alexia Palacios-Peters participated in #thefrontstepsproject while actively running for elected office. Photo credit: Katie Karosich. (Military Families Magazine)

"It became clear that the teacher didn't realize dad was deployed and had been extended four times," Palacios-Peters said. "You're in a military town and how many kid's parents are on the [U.S.S. Abraham] Lincoln?"

It seemed that Coronado, a proud Navy town with a high military population, didn't have strong military representation.

"Not all of them are residents here or are able to vote here," Palacio-Peters said. As a politically-active resident, she hopes to "be that voice for military families because decisions are going to affect our kids."

Being a voice in local communities is not out of reach for the average disinterested citizen.

Before Melissa Oakley decided to run for elected office, she actively participated in politics, founding the Onslow Beat Conservative News Blog. Oakley is pictured interviewing Congressman Dr. Greg Murphy (R) after his first town hall. (Military Families Magazine)

"I really wasn't into politics," Melissa Oakley, a Marine Corps spouse who is running for the Board of Education in Onslow County, North Carolina, said. "I had the mindset 'I'm a military spouse and they know I'm going to move, and they don't want us.' But in reality, they really do want us."

Oakley's call to service was born out of her personal conviction to help her community. She founded a food pantry and supported local like-minded political leaders. According to Oakley, local government involvement is vital.

"A lot of people think that we need to focus on the president; no not really. Because if you're a homeowner your local government is controlling your property taxes being raised," she said.

Military spouses can make a difference in the communities in which they live. The only hurdle is finding a way to get involved.

Where do I start?

Because Melissa Peck, a Navy spouse, was stationed in Japan with her family, she felt removed from the 2016 election cycle. Rather than throwing up her hands in frustration, upon her return to the U.S. she immediately joined her local political committee and brought her family along for the ride.

"All four of my kids have gone canvassing with me," Peck said. "They have attended political rallies. We hosted a meet and greet for a congressional candidate in our home."

Today, Peck is an elected leader of her local political party.

All candidates agree. You don't have to run for office to make a difference. Whether you contribute one hour a month, or you turn your volunteering into a full-time job, it is appreciated. It's attainable. And it makes a difference.

Wondering what you can do to make an impact on your community? You don't have to run for office to make change happen:

Easy next steps

  1. Register to vote.
  2. Volunteer for a candidate or political party you support.
  3. Research candidates for the 2020 election via Vote411.org.
  4. Go to school board meetings.
  5. Show up to virtual and in-person town halls.
  6. Sign a petition for a cause you support.
  7. Involve your kids. Show them the process isn't just for politicians.

This article originally appeared on Military Families Magazine. Follow @MilFamiliesMag on Twitter.