MIGHTY MILSPOUSE

How and when to tell a job you might be PCSing

Are you PCSing soon? Or is a PCS in the works? While it can be hard to tell exactly when you might be leaving before hard orders are issued, in the military world, it's pretty much a given that you will be leaving. If not anytime soon, then soon after that.


It's just a part of the lifestyle.

Why it’s a Potential Setback

As a military spouse who works as a civilian (but tied to military schedules and locations in "normal" careers), PCSing can throw a wrench right into your plans. Before you can promote, before you can achieve seniority … or just as you get settled, it's time to move. That means finding another job, and wondering if you'll have your frequent moves held against you.

But how do you tell your current job you're PCSing? And when?

Look at Your Work Relationship

This is a tricky situation; there are horror stories of spouses suddenly being laid off once orders arrived. Don't fall victim to this scheme. Consider the type of relationship you have with your current company and let it guide you. Do you get along well? Is there a hostile corporate environment where the competition is high?

Technically, you do not owe anymore more than two weeks of notice before you leave. But in most scenarios, it's courteous to let your employer know when you'll be leaving town 1) so they can start looking for a replacement and 2) you can be a part of the training process. OR secret option 3) you can start working with them on a remote position setup.

If you have a good relationship with work and get orders well in advance, tell them. Talk about possibilities for staying on, and what the change might look like. However, if you're genuinely worried about getting the boot, keep mum. Your work is not owed any personal information, especially when you fear that sharing will hurt your income.

Staying on Remote

A growing option among military spouses is the ability to work for a single company remotely. With easier online access and accountability, telecommuting is not only viable as a long term career, it's cost effective.

Bring up this move to your boss; go in with a plan so they aren't worried about logistics. Talk about your hours, your workload, and how you'd love to stay on with them well into the future. Help your chances by including stats on remote work, platforms that can help keep everyone on track, and even savings that are in it for the company but not paying for an additional office seat.

Of course, the biggest perk to working as a remote employee is that your company gets to keep you. They don't have to train a new worker or start over with brand nuances or expertise. Play up your specialties for a solid sell.

How To Drop the News

There doesn't need to be anything formal about sharing military orders. A simple, "Hey we're moving to Texas!" Or "Colorado will be seeing us soon." Remember to drop in all the hard details, as well as the ones you don't yet have. For instance, when you're moving, how long you'll be there, what it means for your availability, and any specific report times.

There can be light at the end of the tunnel by letting your current job know you're moving, and when. Consider current working relationships and how that can plan into future moves for all involved, including the possibility of remote work.