Grant Broggi has been struggling right alongside many other small business owners due to the worldwide pandemic. But there's probably one big difference: He's a Marine.

Broggi opened The Strength Co. in 2017 after receiving his Starting Strength Coach Certification in 2016. He opened his second gym location in southern California in January 2019 and was getting ready to open his third location when COVID-19 hit the United States, forcing business closures due to quarantine mandates. "I always thought if it [a pandemic] came, it would be bad. I also knew I had a responsibility to my coaches and the members...I've faced harder things than this, but this is a pretty prolonged hard thing," he explained.


Going through training within the Marine Corps definitely prepared Broggi for the pandemic. "In Marine Officer School the number one thing said is, 'Make a decision, lieutenant!' it might be wrong or right, but you have to make a decision," he said. When the quarantine mandate came down, he didn't simply close his doors and wait.

Broggi jumped into action.

"Any hesitation and you lost speed and tempo…I had a bunch of members but only 16 squat racks. I had made squat racks in the Marine Corps, so we started cranking those out and giving them out for free to members." Broggi's company also adapted and started offering online strength classes to keep their members engaged. But he wanted to do more and when he couldn't get the equipment for them, he decided to make it himself.

Broggi's gym then began manufacturing racks for members.

"I started buying steel and went to a welder. It was always very clear to me that it had to be done. The only way now it seems is to invest more and double down…People asked me why I was manufacturing, I would just say people need to keep lifting. I think it's important for their survival and is good for them – especially now," Broggi said. The Strength Co.'s overall mission is to use barbell training to help people get strong for life – mentally and physically.

He credits his team for their strength as well, saying that because everyone truly follows the concept of strength for health and survival – they've been able to adapt and keep going in the midst of the pandemic.

"Now more than ever, people are dealing with adversity daily in their own homes and cities. There's unrest in American cities that just blows my mind," he shared. With the country beginning to feel the negative mental health effects of continued quarantine and social distancing measures, Broggi sees the negative impact it's having every day. He continued, "It can't be underplayed on how people are feeling. They are not prepared for this… When we get deployed, it's what we signed up for and what we trained for. People aren't trained for this. I think people just needed leadership, they are scared. A lot of what we do is to try to bring positivity back," Broggi said. Keeping people connected and engaged is difficult without the ability to open his gyms as the cases of COVID-19 continue to soar in California, but Broggi remains committed to finding ways to be innovative in helping people continue to train and build strength.

Sometimes Marines themselves need a little strength coaching, too. Even with the Marine Corps having one of the toughest and longest basic training around, he said he was still surprised when he took leadership of his first group of Marines in 2012.

"I got my first unit in the Marine Corps…I remember looking at them the first time thinking, 'Are you kidding me?' Of course, Marines are scrappy no matter what – so I started coaching them. We had less people going to med or falling out on hikes and we had a more prepared unit by the end of it. That really resonated with me, that this [building strength] is preparing you for life or an uncertain event," he shared. When he and his unit deployed to Afghanistan, they didn't stop training either.

They just got creative.

"We had weights on a wooden platform, it was very hodge-podge. We hung a big whiteboard and it had every Marine's name on it. It's not just about being competitive, it's the achievement and hard work that matters," Broggi said. When he returned stateside and went into the reserves, he knew he wanted to continue teaching and helping people develop their own strength.

Fast forward to now, owning two gyms during a global pandemic. Broggi continues to think and power forward like he was trained to as a Marine. Not only is the company making squat racks, benches, deadlift mats and all American leather weightlifting belts, but now they are having 'Made in USA' cast iron Olympic weights being manufactured in Wisconsin.

"I think we are all cut from the same cloth in terms of the driving factor. That's why I stayed in the reserves, it made me feel fulfilled even while launching the gyms," Broggi said. He explained that most members of the Armed Forces seek that deep feeling of purpose and fulfilment. It's something he hopes to bring to each of his gym members.

One workout at a time.

To learn about the Starting Strength method and The Strength Co., check out their website.