Every now and then, the pricks known as 'Blue Falcons' come and ruin things for everyone else. They break the rules and make everyone else suffer. They rat out their brothers- and sisters-in-arms. They even damage the reputation of others to make themselves look better.


Blue Falcons (also known as Buddy F*ckers) are the most hated people within the military. But as much hate as these troops get from others, most of the time, it's not done on purpose. Even if they do it with the best of intentions, when a troop f*cks over their buddies, they're a Blue Falcon and will receive hate accordingly.

1. Reminding the chain of command anything before close-out formation

Every Friday afternoon, every troop looks to their clock, counting down the minutes. The weekend is to begin just as soon as the weekend safety brief is done. Then, the Blue Falcon chimes in with something like, "weren't we supposed to be helping in the motor pool today?"

Okay, so it's not always as obvious as that — that's actively being a Blue Falcon. Most of the time, it's something small like, "man, I can't wait until me and my buddy Jones go out drinking tonight!" The platoon sergeant hears this and remembers Jones is in second platoon, which reminds him that second platoon is doing lay-outs because First Sergeant said so.

Just what everyone wants to do right before they were supposed to get out of there...

(Photo by Capt. John Farmer)

2. Making a mistake and saying "but we didn't know that"

When troops mess up and accept responsibility for their actions, they get their wrists slapped, take their punishment, and move on. No one's perfect and the chain of command knows this (even if they like to pretend otherwise).

Blue Falcons who try to cover their tracks and hide behind ignorance might get a pass if they genuinely do not know better. This, in turn, forces the chain of command to verify that everyone knows what the Blue Falcon did was wrong.

And the military tends to use a sledgehammer-sized solution for a nail-sized problem.

(Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class William Cousins)

3. Telling the truth when silence is better

Honesty is a well-respected quality in a subordinate. If something is wrong, it's great to have someone who tells the truth and speaks out to correct problems. This becomes an issue, however, if the problem isn't that big of a deal and it involves others in the unit.

Now, don't get this twisted. Speak out if you ever see something unsafe, criminal, or unbecoming of a service-member. But if it's something like, "when did Sgt. Jones say that his dental appointment would end?" You don't need to answer and screw him over. Just shrug.

You really can't tell when dental appointments end. Best to assume it's all day unless you know for sure.

(Photo by Lance Cpl. Ricardo Davila)

4. Breaking some bizzare, off-the-wall law that nobody knows about

Certain laws are pounded into everyone's head at every safety brief. Don't drink and drive. Don't physically or sexually assault anyone. Don't do dumb sh*t. And every now and then, the commander needs to brief the entire unit because one person screwed up.

Let's pretend that a soldier stationed at Fort Huachuca, Arizona accidentally destroys a saguaro cactus. That's actually a 25-year prison sentence. If one troop screws up and gets charged, the commander must throw "don't destroy cacti" into their weekly safety brief and everyone else has to sit and listen.

Seriously. If you must fulfill your cactus-destroying urges, do it in New Mexico.

5. Going above and beyond what's required

Every leader wants their unit to be the best possible unit, both for bragging rights and for pride. When one troop does amazing work, they're showered with praise rarely given in the military. Most troops strive to be the best they can give to earn praise and accolades. BZ! Good job! Keep up the good work!

The problem comes when leaders see how great one troop is and questions why the rest aren't at that same level. This tip isn't meant to discourage everyone from trying hard, it's meant for leaders who try to push unrealistic expectations.

At least with "Soldier of the Whenever" boards, just attending is good enough.

(Photo by Staff Sgt. John Etheridge)