Articles

4 crimes you learn to commit in the military

We're not saying everyone in the military does these things, just that it's almost impossible to complete an enlistment without someone either encouraging you, or even teaching you, to:


4. Commit petty theft

(Photo: U.S. Navy)

"Gear adrift is a gift" and similar maxims are just cute ways of saying that it's sometimes okay to steal. But it's not. There's no law that says it stops being government property or someone else's personal property if they forgot to lock it up or post a guard.

This includes "acquiring" needed items for the squad by snatching up unsecured gear or trading for someone's off-the-books printer. We know you have to get your CLP, but at least try to get some from the armorer before turning to theft.

3. Smuggle alcohol through the mail

If their breath never smells minty fresh, maybe get suspicious of their constant mouthwash use.

It's only legal to ship alcohol through the United States Postal System if you have a license or if it's in a product like mouthwash. Of course, that mouthwash isn't supposed to be 80 proof.

But every time a unit gets ready for deployment, the veterans start talking about the super illegal practice of asking family members to pour vodka into empty mouthwash bottles, mix in a few drops of blue and green food coloring, and send it to the base in the mail. Many of the old timers are just making jokes, but it still spreads the knowledge of the tactic. (Which this article also does. Crap.)

2. Lie on federal forms

The Defense Travel System is reasons 1-3 that no one should ever re-enlist. (Photo: U.S. Air National Guard Master Sgt. Christopher Botzum)

Let's be honest, perfectly filled out Defense Travel System vouchers and unit packing lists are the exception to the rule. Sometimes, this is because it's hard to track every little change in a connex's contents or a trip. But other times, it's because units on their way out the door on an exercise or deployment are willing to put whatever they need to on the paperwork to get it approved.

It's an expedient way to get the mission done, but it's also a violation of Title 18 United States Code 1001, which prohibits false claims to the federal government. Of course, no one is going to prosecute when a connex shows up with three more cots than were on the list, but don't listen to the barracks attorney telling you that the per diem is higher if you just change this one thing in DTS.

1. Abuse prescription medication

Perfectly legal in training and combat, actually a crime when using it to avoid a hangover with a prescription. (Photo: U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Nicholas Farina)

Most troops aren't out there injecting illegally acquired morphine, but most people would probably be surprised to learn that intravenous saline is a prescription medical device (yeah, saltwater in a bag). So are those 800mg Motrins.

And teaching a bunch of troops to give saline injections to each other does help them save lives in combat, but it also prepares them to tack an extra criminal charge onto their alcohol-fueled bender when they get home and stick themselves with a needle to try to avoid getting hungover (which, seriously guys, stop giving yourselves IVs while drunk).

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