Articles

A shoulder to cry on? Service secretaries bemoan lack of progress on the job

In what should not be a surprise to anyone familiar with the current state of Washington, the three service secretaries complained Oct. 24 about how hard it was to get anything done because of the cumbersome Pentagon bureaucracy and Congress' inability to approve a spending budget on time.


In a forum sponsored by the Center for a New American Security in D.C., Air Force Sec. Deborah Lee James said she had been surprised by "how difficult it is to get anything done in Washington, how difficult it is to move your agenda."

James specifically mentioned the political stalemate in the Congress and "the need to get back to compromise."

Navy Sec. Ray Mabus said his biggest surprise and frustration was "how slowly the bureaucracy moves, particularly DoD-wide." If you want to do something, he said, the response is "we have to study this, or you have to do it DoD-wide" instead of letting the individual services act.

Army Sec. Eric Fanning said he was surprised by "how much time that would be spent on the budget every year," because "we don't have any stability" in the congressional budget process.

All three of the secretaries said they were trying to take steps within their service to bypass the ponderous procurement process, with James and Fanning citing the rapid capabilities offices their services have established to get gear fielded quicker — even if it wasn't "a 100 percent solution."

The procurement system is set up to seek the ultimate solution, which is a problem because the adversary moves quicker, Fanning said.

Mabus endorsed that view and said the Navy has "been doing pilot programs," to move prospective systems out to the fleet instead of following the lengthy process for a program of record. The idea, he said, "is to get something out faster," and possibly to "fail faster."

He cited the Navy's deployment of an experimental laser defensive weapon system on the USS Ponce in the Persian Gulf, which is influencing decisions on follow-on weapons.

James said the advice she would offer her successor in the next administration would be to spend less time on review and oversight on smaller programs so the acquisition specialists could have more time for the biggest programs.

The three secretaries, who would be expected to leave office when a new president and defense secretary take over next year, said they are involved in a detailed process run by Defense Sec. Ash Carter's office to prepare briefing papers on programs, budget and personnel issues for their successors.

The secretaries were introduced by Michele Flournoy, CEO of CNAS, who is widely rumored to be the next defense secretary if Hillary Clinton becomes president.

The three officials insisted that their services were ready to fight the current battles against violent extremists, such as ISIL, but said they were concerned about their ability to prepare those forces for a future fight against a high-end adversary due to the uncertain and constrained defense budgets, the intense pace of operations and reductions in their force levels.

Among the emerging threats they were trying to prepare for, the secretaries cited cyber attacks from high-end rivals such as Russia, and armed unmanned aerial vehicles, which already are showing up in Iraq.

James noted the explosive loaded UAV that killed three Kurdish Peshmerga fighters in Iraq recently. And she said the Air Force detected an "unmanned system in the vicinity" of its deployed forces and "was able to bring it down with electronic means" rather than shooting it down. She declined to say how that was done.

Asked if they would be able to conduct a "no-fly zone" over rebel-held areas of Syria, which some have advocated, James said, "we know how to do this," but it would require money, people and resources that would have to come from other commitments.

But because the Air Force would be supported by the Navy and perhaps coalition partners, "I have to believe we would figure out how to do it," she said

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