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America's Mosul strategy might just lead to 'ISIS 3.0'

The U.S.-backed coalition effort to retake the city of Mosul officially began Monday, but experts say the end of the battle against ISIS is far from over.


Pentagon officials warned reporters before the operation began that ISIS was likely to convert to insurgency after losing the city of Mosul. "If anything, it's gonna be more difficult," is how Canadian Army Brig. Gen. Dave Anderson described the coming fight against ISIS as an insurgent force.

The retaking of Mosul highlights the Obama administration's central belief that retaking territory from ISIS constitutes victory against the group. "It's as if we've decided by taking territory back, they won't be terrorists anymore," Dr. Frederick Kagan of the American Enterprise Institute previously told The Daily Caller News Foundation.

As ISIS reverts to a guerrilla insurgency, Iraq must begin to grapple with the underlying sectarian tensions that threaten to engulf it after the defeat of ISIS. The operation to retake Mosul is composed of the U.S., Iraqi Security Forces, Kurdish Peshmerga, Iranian-backed Shiite militias, and Turkish troops. Each group has its own vested interest in the future of Mosul and greater Iraq.

"What has emerged from the conflict is a complex patchwork of ethnic, tribal and religious militias that claim fief over particular territories," Ramzy Mardini of the Atlantic Council leveled a stark warning on the administration's pursuit of defeating ISIS in a recent op-ed for The New York Times.

Shiite militias participating alongside Iraqi Security Forces in anti-ISIS operations have well known ties to humanitarian atrocities against Sunni civilians. The United Nations estimates nearly 1.5 million civilians remain in Mosul, and if Sunni citizens are harassed or outright killed by militias it could lend sympathy to defeated ISIS terrorists. ISIS's history lies in a guerrilla insurgent force that capitalized on sectarian tensions to seize territory.

Retired Army Gen. David Petraeus parroted Mardini's thinking in August, saying failure to stabilize post-ISIS Iraq could lead to the rise of another version of ISIS.  "The challenge of Mosul and Nineveh is the considerable number of ethnic groups, religious sects, tribes and other elements that make up the province."

Ultimately, Petraeus warns the biggest challenge in Iraq is not the defeat of ISIS, but is "to ensure post-conflict security, reconstruction and, above all, governance that is representative of and responsive to the people." He warns, "Failure to do so could lead to ISIS 3.0."

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