Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings? - We Are The Mighty
Articles

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?

This new Navy tech aims to use lasers to fool air defense systems and missiles into thinking they see multiple aircraft or even a UAP for that matter–but the plan wasn’t to trick the world into thinking they were being visited by aliens.

America uses stealth technology not just to avoid detection, but to avoid being shot down after they’ve been detected. A recent patent filed by the U.S. Navy meant to increase the survivability of stealth aircraft might do just that, but if the system works the way it’s supposed to, it could just as easily be used to project images into the sky that would look and act a whole lot like the strange crafts depicted in UAP footage released by the U.S. military in recent years.

How can Navy tech be responsible for UAP sightings?

This video contains the same content as the rest of this story.

When talking military aviation, it’s not uncommon for many to think of “stealth” as a singular technology utilized to help advanced aircraft defeat detection. The truth, of course, is a lot more complicated than that. Stealth might be more accurately described as an approach to warfare, rather than a specific piece of gear. In order to leverage a stealth aircraft effectively, pains must be taken to limit the platform’s radar cross-section (from multiple angles), its infrared detectability (the amount of heat it releases), and to create a mission flight plan that keeps the aircraft operating to its advantage, rather than its detriment.

The truth is, many of America’s most advanced stealth aircraft aren’t actually invisible to radar detection at all. The intent behind stealth isn’t truly to go entirely unnoticed in many instances, but instead, to prevent an opponent from being able to effectively engage and shoot down your aircraft. To that end, even “stealth” platforms like the F-22 Raptor can actually be spotted on radar using lower frequency bands. Radar systems leveraged in this way can spot sneaky intruders, but they’re not good for establishing a weapon’s grade lock on anything. In other words, lower-frequency radar bands can be used to see stealth planes coming, but can’t be used to shoot them down.

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?
B-2 Spirit stealth bomber (U.S. Air Force photo)

However, coupling these sorts of radar systems with other forms of air defenses can make for a real threat for stealth aircraft. “Heat-seeking” missiles, which have been around since the 1950s and don’t rely on radar to engage targets effectively sniff out encroaching aircraft by following the infrared signature of the super-heated exhaust exiting the back of the jet. While design elements have been incorporated into stealth aircraft aimed at mitigating these infrared signatures, only so much can be done to hide the heat released by the chemical explosions we use to propel our combat aircraft.

So, even if America’s stealth planes were completely invisible to radar (which they aren’t), they still need to worry about infrared-driven missiles fired in their general direction either as a result of visual detection or low-band radar systems. Pilots go to great lengths to plan out their sorties prior to getting airborne to leverage their stealth aircraft most effectively. Limiting exposure to advanced air defense systems, operating at night to avoid visual detection, and employing strategies regarding altitude and angle of attack all play a role in maintaining a “stealth” profile.

In the event a “heat-seeking” missile does find its way onto the trail of a stealth fighter like the F-22, the aircraft has the ability to deploy flares in an attempt to confuse the infrared-led ordnance. But flares offer an extremely limited form of protection in heavily contested airspace. Because of this, the general rule of thumb on combat sorties is simple: try to avoid situations where the enemy can lob missiles at you, and your chances of success increase dramatically.

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?
(USAF Photo)

However, in a large scale conflict against a technologically capable foe like China or (to a lesser extent) Russia, America’s stealth aircraft would face challenges unlike any they have in modern warfare, as our fleets of sneaky fighters and bombers came up against some of the most advanced air defense systems currently employed anywhere on the planet. In such a war, losses would be all but certain, and while America may employ more stealth aircraft than any other nation, our total numbers remain in the hundreds. So each stealth aircraft lost would truly be felt.

But new technology under patent by the U.S. Navy could shift the odds even further into the favor of stealth aircraft: leveraging lasers to produce plasma bursts that could trick inbound missiles into thinking they’ve found a jet to chase that would actually be little more than a hologram.

This technology has already been used to create laser-plasma balls that can transmit human speech. I’m going to be honest with you here, that sentence is as hard to wrap my head around as the writer as it probably is for you to grasp as a reader. Talking plasma balls? 

Here’s a video from our friends at Military Times running down this cutting edge plasma technology:

Other applications for this laser system include use as a non-lethal weapon and even as a continuous flashbang grenade that could keep opponents in an area disoriented and unable to respond.

So, how does the Navy intend to leverage this sort of technology to make stealth aircraft even harder to hit? According to their patent, the laser system could be installed on the tail of an aircraft, and upon detection of an inbound missile, could literally project an infrared signature that would be comparable to a moving fighter jet’s exhaust out away from the fighter itself. Multiple systems could literally project multiple aircraft, leaving inbound missiles to go after the decoy plasma “fighters” instead of the actual aircraft itself.

These “laser-induced plasma filaments,” as researchers call them, can be projected up to hundreds of meters, depending on the laser system employed, and (here’s the part that’ll really blow your mind) can be used to emit any wavelength of light. That means these systems could effectively display infrared to fool inbound heat-seeking missiles, ultraviolet, or even visible light. Of course, it’s unlikely that the system could be used to mimic the visual cues of an actual aircraft, but it is possible to produce visible barriers between the weapon operator and the stealth aircraft emitting the laser.

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?
 That IR Target signature could feasibly appear to be a UAP to an uninformed observer. (Image courtesy of the US Patent Office)

This system could be deployed instantly, reused throughout a mission, and can stay at a desired altitude or location in mid-air; all things flares can’t do. With enough aircraft equipped with these systems (or enough systems equipped on a single aircraft) this method could be used to do far more than just protect jets. In the future, this approach could become a part of a missile defense system employed by Navy ships, carrier strike groups, or even entire cities.

“If you have a very short pulse you can generate a filament, and in the air that can propagate for hundreds of meters, and maybe with the next generation of lasers you could produce a filament of even a mile,” Alexandru Hening, a lead researcher on the patent, told IT magazine in 2017.

It’s likely that we won’t see this technology lighting up the airspace over combat zones any time soon, as there may well be years of research and development left before it finds its way into operational use. However, some have already begun scratching their heads regarding what it appears these laser-induced plasma filaments can do, and how that could explain the unusual behavior recorded in recently acknowledged Navy footage of unidentified aircraft being tracked on FLIR cameras by F/A-18 Super Hornet pilots.

It seems feasible that this technology could be used to fake just such a UFO or UAP sighting… but then, the earliest of these videos was produced in 2004, which would suggest far more advanced laser systems than the United States currently maintains were already in use some 17 years ago.

Could lasers have been used to fake UAP sightings? It seems feasible, but for now, the military’s focus seems set squarely on defensive applications for the patent.

Want to read more about groundbreaking patents filed by the U.S. Navy in recent years?

Read: NAVY TEAM FLOATS IDEA FOR A ‘SPACETIME MODIFICATION WEAPON’ MORE POWERFUL THAN NUKES


This article by Alex Hollings was originally published by Sandboxx News. Follow Sandboxx News on Facebook.

Feature image courtesy of Transport Canada

MIGHTY TRENDING

Why war with Iran might be a lot more difficult than the US thinks

If the U.S. experience in Iraq and Afghanistan should have taught us anything, it’s that no war can be expected to just be that easy, especially if the ultimate goal is regime change. This is something that military leadership generally recognizes—especially since those conflicts are still going on after more than a decade. For those who have not experienced it, however, it can be easier to forget.


Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?

And we might have been fighting Iran for a significant chunk of that period.

The Iranians are definitely outgunned, as the Washington Post reported on June 21, 2019. But as the Post reports and as the Millennium Challenge Exercises go to show, a war with the Islamic Republic could be a very costly one. In the Millennium Challenge, Retired Marine Gen. Paul van Riper was tasked with leading the fictional Iran against a U.S. carrier force. The short version is that Van Riper wiped the floor with the U.S., using only assets Iran had in the real world.

Read: That time a Marine general led a fictional Iran against the US military

Iran’s numbers are substantial, more than a million men in arms against an invader, not counting the Revolutionary Guards, which numbers around another 150,000 troops.

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?

That’s just in terms of manpower. Keep in mind Iran used human waves very well during the eight-year Iran-Iraq War. While Iran is pretty much using the same planes, F-4 and F-14 fighters, as it did against Iraq in the 1980s, they do operate with a powerful anti-air missile screen. Even with their best pilots, however, this may not be enough to keep the U.S. from getting total air superiority, and Iran has a plan for that.

In order to keep naval forces at bay, the Islamic Republic Army is expected to use small-boat tactics for use against a much larger enemy, swarming around and laying mines while hassling international shipping, which could be the most dangerous casualty of such a war. The biggest issue is still yet to come.

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?

Iranian proxies like Hezbollah are another region issue.

Iran has tens of thousands of unconventional troops and fighters with proxy forces in the region, projecting Iranian power and influence from its borders with Afghanistan in the east all the way throughout Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon in the west and beyond. These proxy forces have been harassing American and allies positions for decades. Any outbreak of open hostilities will only embolden those forces to step up their attacks against U.S. troops and ships in the Persian Gulf region.

The United States enjoys a superior technological and numerical advantage over Iran, but the Iranians aren’t going to just crumble and surrender to helicopters the way Iraqi forces have done in the past.

MIGHTY CULTURE

The 13 funniest military memes for the week of April 13

It appears that the military’s very own meme branch is getting its own series on Netflix on May 29. Space Force is set to star Steve Carell and will be helmed by Carell and showrunner of the American version of The Office, Greg Daniels.

In all fairness, they seem to be grasping the concept of the Space Force being a smaller entity within the DoD to protect satellites and how monotonous it will get after awhile fairly spot on. So basically, it’s The Office. In space… Office Space? Wait, no. That name’s taken…

This is awesome news for anyone else sick of hearing about Tiger King. I’ve never seen that show but through meme-mitosis, I can assume it’s about what happens in the surrounding areas of a military base. I may be desperate for entertainment, but I’m not desperate enough to see what the people at the Wal-Mart outside of Fort Sill would do with a tiger. And hopefully Space Force delivers on that.

Anyways, here are your memes for the week:

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2F3_AgyGQ4pBVln3rWHJSXxxsLCo-oVdhoovOfWo3H-u3FCB-dgkdljko9-dX0VSrzLeK-EHfHd0-c8iHjMVNqxIV4JX8N1x5adbJHvfYb&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh3.googleusercontent.com&s=829&h=e70d2c988ceb41388836aaa8e1c6f79705c969129139805740dc5f9ab55a0bf3&size=980x&c=4150329853 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252F3_AgyGQ4pBVln3rWHJSXxxsLCo-oVdhoovOfWo3H-u3FCB-dgkdljko9-dX0VSrzLeK-EHfHd0-c8iHjMVNqxIV4JX8N1x5adbJHvfYb%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh3.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D829%26h%3De70d2c988ceb41388836aaa8e1c6f79705c969129139805740dc5f9ab55a0bf3%26size%3D980x%26c%3D4150329853%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Army as F*ck)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FZnfepFd5iRaip8U6_3CuXG7KMms3lcwFCOxM5thNLnP7a9q1jof6iDqT85Cf2qPgxPa761IhMgUeNt7eEmsLI_1fmtTB23UA-HrQpyu7U3NjRYe03m_XeCVL82gigZuJkHsV09hgkSwXukHrkQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh4.googleusercontent.com&s=646&h=efb0e013e94bf090d29881f915057db60913e507577e3eda3b51996902c137f1&size=980x&c=1201579727 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FZnfepFd5iRaip8U6_3CuXG7KMms3lcwFCOxM5thNLnP7a9q1jof6iDqT85Cf2qPgxPa761IhMgUeNt7eEmsLI_1fmtTB23UA-HrQpyu7U3NjRYe03m_XeCVL82gigZuJkHsV09hgkSwXukHrkQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh4.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D646%26h%3Defb0e013e94bf090d29881f915057db60913e507577e3eda3b51996902c137f1%26size%3D980x%26c%3D1201579727%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Disgruntled Vets)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FRTIg4IDjzT9ho8Tih_JIEhXwsx3FOwG55fi_F02Z-7UbKTssHZt5I5BVRY3N-2lY5ZkJqIghtJWlxb_4q_LmzNLbVUXJ-lkYLvvbiKGoCZxlxz134fXkgesXaXAxeqSJyeRikUS0sqoGcrEf1w&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh3.googleusercontent.com&s=645&h=a876bb248eb966c787fbb74711127efb5ed87335182aaa595c3ce4afa2306d8e&size=980x&c=818651597 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FRTIg4IDjzT9ho8Tih_JIEhXwsx3FOwG55fi_F02Z-7UbKTssHZt5I5BVRY3N-2lY5ZkJqIghtJWlxb_4q_LmzNLbVUXJ-lkYLvvbiKGoCZxlxz134fXkgesXaXAxeqSJyeRikUS0sqoGcrEf1w%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh3.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D645%26h%3Da876bb248eb966c787fbb74711127efb5ed87335182aaa595c3ce4afa2306d8e%26size%3D980x%26c%3D818651597%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via US Army WTF Moments Memes)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FeEsWjHiV3rczqroeRASN27Kc1UwtkM95pv2HZ57PrpnHjtQwF4DOFZzhYGceILpcB6d8VgcO34OLeaV_pnPoatqYaGbjv70xkZotJMcn7He-G3OhLqp3uISAS1tnD62YKrN6dV0B&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh6.googleusercontent.com&s=575&h=03b88d33edc11c04d19759684db65e9d03897ae57bfed1b929baf674a9b1b2ec&size=980x&c=521461964 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FeEsWjHiV3rczqroeRASN27Kc1UwtkM95pv2HZ57PrpnHjtQwF4DOFZzhYGceILpcB6d8VgcO34OLeaV_pnPoatqYaGbjv70xkZotJMcn7He-G3OhLqp3uISAS1tnD62YKrN6dV0B%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh6.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D575%26h%3D03b88d33edc11c04d19759684db65e9d03897ae57bfed1b929baf674a9b1b2ec%26size%3D980x%26c%3D521461964%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Call for Fire)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FvjGgH6AH-6DBSk8LhYPiknbQDXhHrQZ3OMgsdpPnK0CXdcZ-09_MUGY-3zeISso2BIetclls3Ba-8cT7zStXSDeuMNXSK-IH0AMFRXQCALFFEd8Y6_ctk0ft_XTWtDjqg3HbWtlxGYHCaYDD8A&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh6.googleusercontent.com&s=275&h=dcf55095db7e05d9daad40f0c2dceffe032c8690bcd96b2b86ecc4be55a6fc31&size=980x&c=697830099 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FvjGgH6AH-6DBSk8LhYPiknbQDXhHrQZ3OMgsdpPnK0CXdcZ-09_MUGY-3zeISso2BIetclls3Ba-8cT7zStXSDeuMNXSK-IH0AMFRXQCALFFEd8Y6_ctk0ft_XTWtDjqg3HbWtlxGYHCaYDD8A%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh6.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D275%26h%3Ddcf55095db7e05d9daad40f0c2dceffe032c8690bcd96b2b86ecc4be55a6fc31%26size%3D980x%26c%3D697830099%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Not CID)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FkJGC80LZswAci0bO5CUMuk4HtKKAAugou1ocYTP5cFUK-ylnag5v-lfcFhG3XUO7BZOi77U7Er9G2lGl8ZjNHNQH-eC39M5-_TFxKjAAswywfbf3zd-qyETDu8oxqonaNOA9k-zcmN46qG7RvQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh3.googleusercontent.com&s=470&h=0bce27ee5656923d0bdaa67286e0cb6a1e7cedaf760aab82afbef6c40002bc66&size=980x&c=748443404 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FkJGC80LZswAci0bO5CUMuk4HtKKAAugou1ocYTP5cFUK-ylnag5v-lfcFhG3XUO7BZOi77U7Er9G2lGl8ZjNHNQH-eC39M5-_TFxKjAAswywfbf3zd-qyETDu8oxqonaNOA9k-zcmN46qG7RvQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh3.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D470%26h%3D0bce27ee5656923d0bdaa67286e0cb6a1e7cedaf760aab82afbef6c40002bc66%26size%3D980x%26c%3D748443404%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Infantry Follow Me)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FsZq49eOUDiIC4RC6Pb1swWeliKORYKhoVBH2SAn_ZXpa00Ba2K2ty3lHa6Pmu88HbEToaPC_ejSqaPi6tYhs5anGmWwL_k793xQGmu4zBGEdMX_uP_Nl8eQ2E755P8GK3Y7_1GLPejULVdqwJg&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com&s=274&h=0720d22d9d68e8508ed563e715a11b9fdc82928d0522e02f8aaa905f15856170&size=980x&c=67978889 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FsZq49eOUDiIC4RC6Pb1swWeliKORYKhoVBH2SAn_ZXpa00Ba2K2ty3lHa6Pmu88HbEToaPC_ejSqaPi6tYhs5anGmWwL_k793xQGmu4zBGEdMX_uP_Nl8eQ2E755P8GK3Y7_1GLPejULVdqwJg%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh5.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D274%26h%3D0720d22d9d68e8508ed563e715a11b9fdc82928d0522e02f8aaa905f15856170%26size%3D980x%26c%3D67978889%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via The Army’s Fckups)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FnjCOJGvU7g6w1U4YKrx2NwRE8AWhId-gkjMwsFyM8fAvyt1gaJGXm_yehPu38OOf3QfC4beq5ZIlkHjHznB4WbgweNLbFSQy23Zi9z7aWevADhOcKQ5GbseeH8RjLrtuEYk_sVcGV5XhQ0XWsQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh6.googleusercontent.com&s=544&h=b4d2b7194ad8c15fc6a9b2fe0136201f4b08ae4704588383c083e080434eb8b3&size=980x&c=1467475325 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FnjCOJGvU7g6w1U4YKrx2NwRE8AWhId-gkjMwsFyM8fAvyt1gaJGXm_yehPu38OOf3QfC4beq5ZIlkHjHznB4WbgweNLbFSQy23Zi9z7aWevADhOcKQ5GbseeH8RjLrtuEYk_sVcGV5XhQ0XWsQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh6.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D544%26h%3Db4d2b7194ad8c15fc6a9b2fe0136201f4b08ae4704588383c083e080434eb8b3%26size%3D980x%26c%3D1467475325%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Coast Guard Memes)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2F5QW4pNuVL3wazGSITma3Tb1Ve8bumZEBEJTOOMttay2LrMGiUeMLErc0G4nUfdUXsSdtBh2xbRaF3pUPEqMEO1GrXVuEnbD4aHpGSmL0Bu31WEtAMqAFrkE1Fb5wJpJj1g01t1MKLWWvOMflsw&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh3.googleusercontent.com&s=858&h=5a0a6af1a5f0d3f4a512e8d5ff7de345147cf612fe5bac06c6825dec67fe75c7&size=980x&c=3363932457 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252F5QW4pNuVL3wazGSITma3Tb1Ve8bumZEBEJTOOMttay2LrMGiUeMLErc0G4nUfdUXsSdtBh2xbRaF3pUPEqMEO1GrXVuEnbD4aHpGSmL0Bu31WEtAMqAFrkE1Fb5wJpJj1g01t1MKLWWvOMflsw%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh3.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D858%26h%3D5a0a6af1a5f0d3f4a512e8d5ff7de345147cf612fe5bac06c6825dec67fe75c7%26size%3D980x%26c%3D3363932457%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via PT Belt Nation)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FaUyvTYe0qPieZSarY79HSmJl3isb5ih61NLx2XpGaq4udIJmwvTdcAoVYM1WDRv5Hd7FRlqRhsvkJQrAAE85fs37CrAmxgyqlzzsNxAfpAuUAfP60tVUMBf1YoMrPJufV9pO8tkQiLZ25pVYog&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh6.googleusercontent.com&s=949&h=e8909ff696506f41a3d5eb4b71cdc207db1a245c966952dad55244a2a38c43a1&size=980x&c=376561220 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FaUyvTYe0qPieZSarY79HSmJl3isb5ih61NLx2XpGaq4udIJmwvTdcAoVYM1WDRv5Hd7FRlqRhsvkJQrAAE85fs37CrAmxgyqlzzsNxAfpAuUAfP60tVUMBf1YoMrPJufV9pO8tkQiLZ25pVYog%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh6.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D949%26h%3De8909ff696506f41a3d5eb4b71cdc207db1a245c966952dad55244a2a38c43a1%26size%3D980x%26c%3D376561220%22%7D” expand=1]

(meme via Valhalla Wear)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2Fgh6cSA8EyMjGVokgHVn-FhVrVuFtuBDf5P3sXR77nJfNUJVesBo4WjDA-BPjV18FqREU4KodcsiPwdPNIgKJ6CIu9tmRuG61ivZCQJHSOeCDd3R8ATWyCH72r1PvUlpHs3tUcdrFZC4dx-SsBw&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh4.googleusercontent.com&s=694&h=767979a3d87a99fcaaaea98c1862d9fb02356e2b17cd576da025bffde571cb73&size=980x&c=1631914311 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252Fgh6cSA8EyMjGVokgHVn-FhVrVuFtuBDf5P3sXR77nJfNUJVesBo4WjDA-BPjV18FqREU4KodcsiPwdPNIgKJ6CIu9tmRuG61ivZCQJHSOeCDd3R8ATWyCH72r1PvUlpHs3tUcdrFZC4dx-SsBw%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh4.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D694%26h%3D767979a3d87a99fcaaaea98c1862d9fb02356e2b17cd576da025bffde571cb73%26size%3D980x%26c%3D1631914311%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via VET Tv)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2Ff6mV0cdP_lFShsNqPpLOmyC-n2dhfE2U2TBgonD8V2uNqlaj3XnDlKxHpdte1fm-wYnpJ7eZ73PYMPu_QCbpDDBNkOqC_MTpGSAMx0QbBYWq_wcSlGCi8TmP6bcOLk5K_EuSEQvZdoBDQ0uJDQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com&s=477&h=3acf0f61d1f84a09b49758e7a052c5be492814918df4aa00ccfbbb9018878b77&size=980x&c=1433129436 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252Ff6mV0cdP_lFShsNqPpLOmyC-n2dhfE2U2TBgonD8V2uNqlaj3XnDlKxHpdte1fm-wYnpJ7eZ73PYMPu_QCbpDDBNkOqC_MTpGSAMx0QbBYWq_wcSlGCi8TmP6bcOLk5K_EuSEQvZdoBDQ0uJDQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh5.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D477%26h%3D3acf0f61d1f84a09b49758e7a052c5be492814918df4aa00ccfbbb9018878b77%26size%3D980x%26c%3D1433129436%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Decelerate Your Life)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FZ5eZsH3UAJ2YBvBV7reula3mqOS2WvgyjDGuN_QJP7PRRPjRcYcnhekzTgO6U4qeLv64hAciQN6Qt32lSdtM4sJtINxWD2yW55e1PFOJ3gzmpFB2Dn-TYVRWQ_S4E2jbtrlJVjiJuQHl_SMXeQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com&s=151&h=7fe190d73e7ce1343b826a798bdd57576784637293d2dbbe0cab0f5f812c93dd&size=980x&c=2576007839 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FZ5eZsH3UAJ2YBvBV7reula3mqOS2WvgyjDGuN_QJP7PRRPjRcYcnhekzTgO6U4qeLv64hAciQN6Qt32lSdtM4sJtINxWD2yW55e1PFOJ3gzmpFB2Dn-TYVRWQ_S4E2jbtrlJVjiJuQHl_SMXeQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh5.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D151%26h%3D7fe190d73e7ce1343b826a798bdd57576784637293d2dbbe0cab0f5f812c93dd%26size%3D980x%26c%3D2576007839%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Pop Smoke)

MIGHTY CULTURE

NASA is helping you make your mark on Mars

Although it will be years before the first humans set foot on Mars, NASA is giving the public an opportunity to send their names — stenciled on chips — to the Red Planet with NASA’s Mars 2020 rover, which represents the initial leg of humanity’s first round trip to another planet. The rover is scheduled to launch as early as July 2020, with the spacecraft expected to touch down on Mars in February 2021.

The rover, a robotic scientist weighing more than 2,300 pounds (1,000 kilograms), will search for signs of past microbial life, characterize the planet’s climate and geology, collect samples for future return to Earth, and pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet.


“As we get ready to launch this historic Mars mission, we want everyone to share in this journey of exploration,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) in Washington. “It’s an exciting time for NASA, as we embark on this voyage to answer profound questions about our neighboring planet, and even the origins of life itself.”

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?

Members of the public who want to send their name to Mars on NASA’s next rover mission to the Red Planet (Mars 2020) can get a souvenir boarding pass and their names etched on microchips to be affixed to the rover.

(NASA/JPL-Caltech)

The opportunity to send your name to Mars comes with a souvenir boarding pass and “frequent flyer” points. This is part of a public engagement campaign to highlight missions involved with NASA’s journey from the Moon to Mars. Miles (or kilometers) are awarded for each “flight,” with corresponding digital mission patches available for download. More than 2 million names flew on NASA’s InSight mission to Mars, giving each “flyer” about 300 million frequent flyer miles (nearly 500 million frequent flyer kilometers).

From now until Sept. 30, 2019, you can add your name to the list and obtain a souvenir boarding pass to Mars here.

The Microdevices Laboratory at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, will use an electron beam to stencil the submitted names onto a silicon chip with lines of text smaller than one-thousandth the width of a human hair (75 nanometers). At that size, more than a million names can be written on a single dime-size chip. The chip (or chips) will ride on the rover under a glass cover.

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?

True color image of Mars taken by the OSIRIS instrument on the ESA Rosetta spacecraft during its February 2007 flyby of the planet.

NASA will use Mars 2020 and other missions to prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet. As another step toward that goal, NASA is returning American astronauts to the Moon in 2024. Government, industry and international partners will join NASA in a global effort to build and test the systems needed for human missions to Mars and beyond.

The Mars 2020 Project at JPL manages rover development for SMD. NASA’s Launch Services Program, based at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, is responsible for launch management. Mars 2020 will launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

For more information on Mars 2020, visit: https://www.nasa.gov/mars2020

For more about NASA’s Moon to Mars plans, visit: https://www.nasa.gov/topics/moon-to-mars

This article originally appeared on NASA. Follow @NASA on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

Was your enlistment ceremony this cool?

World History was made yesterday at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas where the U.S. Army and NASA utilized state of the art technology to provide the most unique Oath of Enlistment ceremony for new soldiers.

“We have an incredible opportunity to experience a dream all of us grew up with – the opportunity to touch the stars… Right now… 250 miles above us… flies the International Space Station, traveling at speeds that defy imagination, circling the planet every 90 minutes. Simply amazing,” said Brigadier General Patrick Michaelis, USAREC Deputy Commanding General. “Though NASA and the U.S. Army have been working together for the past 60 years, this is the first time to host a nationwide Oath of Enlistment from space for over 1000 soldiers in 150 different locations, where they will launch; no pun intended, their careers.”


Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?

U.S. Army Recruiting Command

Twenty five recruits and their families came to celebrate the new soldiers embarking on their new careers via a live video stream from the International Space Station. Recruits got to ask questions to Army Astronaut Colonel Andrew R. Morgan, who has been in space since July 2019 and was selected as an astronaut in 2013. Morgan, a special operations physician, is the commander of the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command’s Army Astronaut Detachment at Johnson Space Center, Texas, and the space station’s flight engineer. Morgan is part of the U.S. Army Astronaut Detachment, which supports NASA with flight crew and provides engineering expertise for human interface with space systems. Additionally, Morgan is a combat veteran with airborne and ranger tabs and has also served as a combat diver. As an astronaut, he has completed seven spacewalks and one space flight to the International Space Station.

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?

U.S. Army Recruiting Command

The recruits tuned in from all over the United States and were able to ask Morgan questions via the video link at the Johnson Space Center. Impressively, it did not take long for the video connection to happen and it was less painful than the time it takes conference calls that occur within the domestic U.S. to get connected. There was a brief lag after each sentence, but nothing different than what a VOIP user experiences via Skype or Facetime.

Morgan welcomed everyone aboard the ISS. When asked if there was recruiting going on for new astronauts, he informed the recruits what standards are needed and shared with them that a strong STEM, science and engineering background with a Master’s Degree was necessary and that they need well-rounded individuals who have the education, but also other qualities.

Morgan opened his uniform zipper to reveal an Army Strong t-shirt, much to the cheers of the recruits. He later displayed all of the US military branch flags and allowed them to float across the screen. He also did a few somersaults.

Also joining in the celebration was the newest Army Astronaut, Lieutenant Colonel Frank Rubio. Rubio entertained live questions from the audience at the Johnson Space Center and gave them lots of advice when facing difficulties in their lives.

Aim high, recruits! Congratulations on your new careers. The sky is literally the limit.

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?

U.S. Army Recruiting Command

Articles

Today in military history: George Washington protests taxation without representation

On May 17, 1769, George Washington brought a list of resolutions to the Virginia colony legislature, subverting British taxation without representation. This act of protest would eventually lead to the armed uprising of the American Revolution.

Voicing frustration felt by many colonists at the time, George Washington brought a stack of retaliatory measures to the floor of the Virginia legislature. Largely in response to the Townshend Acts of 1767, a series of laws passed by the British government on the American colonies that placed new taxes on imports such as paper, paint, lead, glass, and tea. As the colonists had no representation in parliament, these restrictions began to chafe at the colonies.

George Washington’s “non-importation resolutions,” drafted by George Mason, proposed that Virginians should minimize their use of any of the imported goods in an attempt to force Great Britain to rethink the taxes.  

The royal governor dissolved the Virginia legislature but Washington and the other representatives simply went to the house of Alexander Hayes and passed the resolution there on May 18.

While the resolution itself was mainly symbolic, other colonies followed with their own resolutions to show solidarity with Massachusetts, where violent protests against the Townshend Acts had led to a British military occupation of Boston beginning in 1768.

The sentiment against taxation without representation would later snowball into physical protests such as the Boston Tea Party. Finally, tensions came to a boiling point and the first shots of the Revolution were fired at Lexington and Concord in 1775.

Featured Image: The earliest authenticated portrait of George Washington shows him wearing his colonel’s uniform of the Virginia Regiment from the French and Indian War. The portrait was painted about 12 years after Washington’s service in that war, and several years before he would re-enter military service in the American Revolution. Oil on canvas by Charles Willson Peale.

Military Life

Watch Army Special Forces do their own dive training

When we think of Green Berets, we think of tough, highly-trained troops that have been groomed to take on high-priority missions. Seeing as the military is home to a number of unique specializations, it’s easy to assume that when it comes to any kind of amphibious assault or landing, you’ve entered Navy or Marine Corps territory — right? Not necessarily.

The U.S. Army does some of its own diving. In fact, the U.S. Army actually operates a number of its own ships, too, for moving stuff around. In an instance of Hollywood actually getting it right, the 1986 film The Delta Force touched on one instance in which dive training proved very useful: infiltrating a target.


Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?

Chuck Norris prepares to infiltrate a terrorist base in ‘The Delta Force.’ The diving is not Hollywood BS.

(Cannon Films)

So, how do Green Berets learn how to carry out such missions? Well, to even get into the Combat Diver Qualification Course at the Special Forces Underwater Operations School, soldiers must first demonstrate outstanding physical fitness and pass swim tests. Once a Green Beret has arrived in Key West, Florida, they face seven weeks of training.

The training is extremely tough — one of three candidates who attend the school will not pass the course. After another series of tests (known collectively as “Zero Week”), Special Forces diving students learn how to handle SCUBA gear and re-breathers and learn all the skills required for an amphibious insertion. Then, It all culminates in a field training exercise.

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?

One-third of the soldiers training will wash out of the Combat Divers Qualification Course.

(U.S. Army photo by Linda L. Crippen)

Check out the video below to see an old-school video about Green Berets putting their dive training to good use.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJhMxdZAJ64

www.youtube.com

MIGHTY FIT

The top 5 military injuries and how to prevent them

One aspect of military life that is so attractive for so many is the intense fitness regime and the opportunity to engage in physical activities that you wouldn’t normally engage in. The downside of that is that military injuries are extremely common. It’s very rare to meet a member of the armed forces who has not sustained an injury of some sort at one time or another.

Some of the most common military training injuries include knee injuries and musculoskeletal issues that result from heavy impacts and the weights the armed forces are required to carry. But there are also other common military injuries that you might not necessarily expect.

In this guide, we’ll introduce some of the most common military injuries and what you can do to prevent them. We will also look at the experiences of those who are overcoming them, as first told in this To Better Days pain story.


Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?

1) Patellar Tendon Injury

The patellar works with the muscles at the front of your thigh to extend the knee when running, jumping, and kicking. A patellar tendon injury is caused when the tendon connecting your kneecap to your shinbone is damaged or torn. This type of injury is common in sports that involve frequent jumping, such as volleyball and basketball, but it’s also very common in the military.

How to prevent it:

  • Avoid jumping and landing on hard surfaces such as concrete
  • Do exercises to strengthen the leg muscles that support the knees
  • Warm-up and stretch the knee before exercise
  • Warm down and stretch the knee after exercise
  • Wear knee support when doing fitness tests or playing sport

If you do suffer a patellar tendon injury, there are some natural sources of tendonitis pain relief you may want to try. Andrew, who serves in the British Army, uses To Better Days Active Patches to relieve his pain. He had the following to say:

“In my job, we have access to physio and rehabilitation. On top of that, I had shockwave therapy to recharge and rest the tendon, but when I started using To Better Days patches there was an improvement overnight. I can’t describe it any better.”

2) Ankle Sprain

Ankle sprains are the most common type of musculoskeletal injury in the lower limbs and also one of the most common military injuries in active-duty soldiers. Although an ankle sprain might be the least of your worries during Hell Week or some other form of rigorous army training, sprained ankles are extremely debilitating and take time to heal. Often, military personnel do not give ankle sprains the time the ligaments need to heal properly. This increases the likelihood of future and subsequent ankle sprains.

How to prevent it:

  • Always wear boots that provide proper arch support
  • Stand on one leg while performing light upper body exercises to improve your balance and increase the strength of the muscles surrounding the ankle
  • Be mindful when exercising and running on uneven surfaces
  • Use an ankle brace or tape to provide additional support during exercise

3) Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is a disorder rather than an injury, but it’s important that we include it in our list due to its prevalence in the armed forces. One in four veterans suffers from arthritis. It’s one of the main causes of medical discharge from the army. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, which occurs when the protective cartilage that cushions your bones wears away. Osteoarthritis can affect any joint, but it’s most common in the knees, hands, hips, and spine.

How to prevent it:

  • Reduce the risk of joint injuries by warming up and warming down before and after every exercise session
  • Listen to the pain — if you have joint pain that lasts one to two hours or more after exercise then you have done too much
  • Get an assessment by a physical therapist to learn the best exercises you can do to protect your joints
  • Maintain a healthy diet and control your weight and blood sugar levels

4) Shin Splints

Shin splints is an injury that often results from running with improper form or ill-fitting shoes. High mileage running is unavoidable in the military, which makes shin splints a common condition. Although shin splints can be very painful, it’s not usually serious and there are a number of things you can do to treat it.

How to prevent it:

  • Exercise on softer surfaces whenever possible
  • Stretch your calves and hamstrings before and after you exercise
  • Strengthen the muscles in the arch of your foot, e.g. use your toes to pull a towel closer to your feet while you’re sitting down
  • Buy shoes that have the proper support and features for your running style

5) Tinnitus

This condition has nothing at all to do with physical training but it is one of the most common military injuries. Tinnitus is a persistent ringing or buzzing in the ears. It is usually caused by prolonged exposure to the loud noises present in training and combat. Tinnitus can be extremely debilitating for serving soldiers and veterans, so you should take every possible step to prevent it.

How to prevent it:

  • Use ear protection in situations of prolonged exposure to loud noises
  • Stress, anxiety, depression, and fatigue can all contribute to tinnitus, so get plenty of sleep and take steps to treat emotional distress
  • Get regular checkups from your doctor and tell them if you are concerned about hearing loss or tinnitus so they pay special attention to your ears
  • Take supplements such as N-Acetyl-Cysteine and magnesium, which may help to prevent tinnitus.

Be Aware of the Risks

Unfortunately, even during peacetime, soldiers are at a higher risk of injuries due to the physical nature of their jobs. However, whether it’s short-term injuries or persistent, chronic injuries, prevention is always better than a cure. Being aware of the early signs of a problem and taking the necessary steps to reduce the risks are the best ways to stay injury-free.

This article was written by Jacques Deux, a writer with over 10 years of writing experience. He specializes in content about the military, physical fitness, health, and natural ways to relieve pain. In his spare time, he enjoys working out, spending time with his dog, and keeping up with the latest military news.

This article originally appeared on SOFREP. Follow @sofrepofficial on Twitter.


MIGHTY HISTORY

How a single photograph allowed the Japanese emperor to stay in power

On September 2nd, 1945, the foreign affairs delegation of the Japanese Empire boarded the USS Missouri and signed the Japanese Instrument of Surrender under the guidance of Emperor Hirohito, finally putting an end to bloodiest war mankind has ever seen. From that moment on, the world and Japan could start to rebuild.

The bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki forced Japan into an unconditional surrender, accepting all terms stated by the Potsdam Declaration. Among other stipulations, the terms of surrender meant that Japan must give up all lands outside of the mainland unless allowed by the Allied Forces, disarm their military, remove all obstacles to building a democratic society, and eliminate, for all time, “the authority and influence of those who have deceived and misled the people of Japan into embarking on world conquest.”

Despite those terms, it was Emperor Hirohito who vowed to maintain the peace — which was met with much disdain by many Americans and Japanese alike, with the exception of General Douglas MacArthur.


Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?

This photo.

(U.S. Army Photo by Lt. Gaetano Faillace)

The International Military Tribunal for the Far East was set up and those responsible for the many war crimes committed were brought to justice. Prime Ministers Tojo, Hirota, Koiso, and twenty-three others were all found guilty of Class-A war crimes and sentenced to execution. Another 5,700 would be tried for Class-B and -C war crimes. Hirohito and the other members of the Japanese Imperial family were simply exonerated at the request of Gen. MacArthur.

Gen. MacArthur knew that Japanese culture was very intertwined with the throne. Since the Japanese throne was willing to cooperate fully, America was able to turn its eyes to the burgeoning communist threat lurking in Asia. This plan could only work, however, if the people of Japan believed the Emperor when he said that peace between the two nations had been achieved.

With the announcement of that newly struck peace came a photo that was taken by Gen. MacArthur’s personal photographer, Lt. Gaetano Faillace that captured the General and the Emperor’s first meeting on September 27th, 1945.

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?

As devastating as the nuclear bombs were, the firebombings of Tokyo and the rest of Japan were just as bad.

The Japanese press was reluctant to run the photo, but the Americans insisted. At this point in Japanese history, the people had just fought and died for the Emperor because they saw him as having incarnate divinity. Suddenly, some occupying force stepped in and showed the people a picture of their 5′ 5″ Emperor next to a 6-foot-tall American general.

General MacArthur knew the significance of the photo. The Japanese people knew the significance of the photo. And yetEmperor Hirohito gave his blessing for it to be published — affirming his commitment to bringing peace and rebuilding Japan at the expense of the height comparison.

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?

It humanized him and would allow him to stay as head of state well into the 80s.

Calls for Hirohito’s abdication were growing among the Imperial family. While most would call for Hirohito’s son (and current Emperor), Akihito, to assume the throne when of age, other family members scrambled to make cases sit on the throne themselves. Their claim was that Hirohito was, in fact, not divine if he drove the Empire into the ground. Many of those claimants could have spelled ruin for MacArthur’s rebuilding process as some harbored a strong hatred for America.

So, the Humanity Declaration was given on New Year’s Day, 1946. In it, the Emperor stated in front of his entire people that the emperor was not divine and that the Japanese people were no more superior than any other people. MacArthur was pleased because it meant that Japan would move more towards more democratization.

The declaration, in essence, meant that Emperor Hirohito went from being a divine imperial sovereign to a regular constitutional monarch.

Emperor Hirohito formalized the 1947 Constitution of Japan — officially an amendment to the Meiji Constitution — and stripped himself almost entirely of political control. In the following years, Hirohito’s commitment to Japan led to restructuring and the entering of an era called the Japanese Economic Miracle. Japan became the world’s second largest economy by the time of Hirohito’s death on January 7th, 1989.

Articles

These stunning photos show supermodel Kate Upton doing some PT with Marines

The U.S. Marines put supermodel Kate Upton through her paces on Aug. 22 during a workout in Detroit to promote the upcoming Marine Week celebration in the city.


Upton struggled a bit at the end, but was able to complete the training routine that involved a series of aerobic exercises and running as her fiance, Detroit Tigers pitcher Justin Verlander, watched from afar. Upton joined several other Tigers players’ wives and significant others in the session at Wayne State University’s athletic complex that was led by Gunnery Sgt. Sara Pacheco, a Marine Corps fitness instructor.

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?
Model Kate Upton was put through her paces to help the Corps promote a local event. (Photo from AP via News Edge)

“It was (a) very hard workout,” Upton said following the exercise session, which she concluded by collapsing to the grass in an exhausted embrace with a fellow workout warrior. “I knew it was going to be hard. The Marines are very tough.”

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?
Marine Corps fitness instructors bang out some squats with supermodel Kate Upton. (Photo from AP via News Edge)

Verlander, a former American League most valuable player and winner of the Cy Young award as the league’s top pitcher, said afterward that he was proud of Upton for her efforts.

“I think it’s easy to show your support with words. I think going out there and doing that workout I think really shows how much she supports (the military),” Verlander said. He is the founder of the Wins for Warriors charity that supports military service members and their families.

Can this Navy patent explain away many UAP sightings?
Time to ruck up Miss Upton! (Photo from AP via News Edge)

Upton, a world-famous model who has appeared three times on the cover of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue, was on hand to promote Marine Week, which runs Sept. 6-10, and is designed to provide the public with a better understanding of the Corps and its mission and the chance to connect with hundreds of Marines.

Articles

Today in military history: Luftwaffe pilot mistakenly lands in England

On June 23, 1942, a German Luftwaffe pilot got lost and accidentally landed his advanced fighter on a British airfield, allowing the British to capture his plane. Oops.

The Royal Air Force had the technological edge in the air at the start of World War II thanks to the Spitfire fighter, but the 1941 debut of the German Focke Wulf 190 changed all that. The FW 190 was lethal and many pilots on both sides considered it the best fighter of the war.

The British schemed to steal a Fw 190, but worried the plans were unlikely to work. One such scheme included sending a German-speaking RAF pilot in a Luftwaffe uniform and a captured Messerschmitt fighter into France to land at an Fw 190 aerodrome, let off a stream of German, demand a new aircraft, and take off in an Fw 190.

Luckily for them, German pilot Oberleutnant Armin Faber became disoriented during a 1942 dogfight and mistook the Bristol Channel for the English Channel, leading him to land at RAF Pembrey in South Wales, home to the RAF’s Air Gunnery School. Needless to say, the British at the airfield were baffled, but they quickly captured Faber along with his plane.

The RAF was able to study the intact plane and learned that it struggled at high altitudes, giving them a new strategic advantage. Some of the features of the Fw 190 were even worked into future British fighter designs. The insights gleaned from the fighter helped the Allies win control of the skies over northern France and pave the way for the D-Day invasion in June 1944.

Humor

5 military myths that Hollywood has taught us to believe

We love movies! That’s why producers spend millions of dollars making them. Sometimes the films we watch are so compelling, audience members believe every moment that is spoon fed to them is the truth.


We’re all guilty of falling for it. Many movie goers get sold on the narrative as the story unfolds across the big screen — even to the point where the performances feel true to life — and the delicate line between truth and fiction becomes too thin.

Related: 7 life lessons we learned from watching ‘Full Metal Jacket’

So check out these military myths that Hollywood puts in their movies and want us to think actually happen — but don’t fall for it.

1. Vietnam veterans are crazy

Movies and TV shows love to feature characters that had tough military careers and reverted to drinking to suppress the memories. This does happen in real life from time-to-time, but not to everyone.

Most who served during that era use their military experience to propel themselves and inspire others.

2. You throw your clean cover after a military graduation

It’s a lot of work to not only find the cover you just flung into the air but clean the grass stains off too.

Does anyone have a tide pen? (Paramount)

3. Cinematic deaths

They just don’t exist — but we tip our hats to filmmaker Oliver Stone (an Army veteran) for capturing this epic movie moment in 1986s Platoon.

How many rounds do you think he took? (Orion Pictures)

4. That one guy who can save the day

In the military, you train as a team and you fight as one, as well.

The debate isn’t if one single person can save another’s ass during battle — that frequently happens.

What we call bullsh*t on is when that single motivator springs into action and becomes the final denominator and leads them to victory as the rest of his team remains pinned down and losing the fight.

They have the need for speed (Paramount)

5. No one gets concussions…ever

We’ve seen countless movies where people get blown up by various sources of explosive ordnance and seem to recover right away (just watch any 80s movie). Since we want to believe the good guys are as tough as nails, they will just brush off the injury and carry on.

It rarely happens like that.

In fact, the traumatic brain injury has been called the signature wound of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mgf3xEOYCts
Hearing a phone or bells ringing is one of the first signs of concussion (Sony)

Can you think of any others? Comment below.

Articles

See the dramatic footage of an ISIS attack on Iraqi tanks

On Oct. 17 an Iraqi-led coalition began the long battle for Mosul, Iraq’s second largest city and an important hub for ISIS.


And the Internet is already getting flooded with videos and photos from the fighting.

The Twitter feed Conflict News (@conflicts) released footage of the Iraqi Army’s 9th Armored Division rolling towards the fighting near the outskirts of Mosul:

About an hour later, Kurdistan24, a Kurdish news channel, released this footage of Iraqi Army tanks suffering a vehicle-borne IED attack by ISIS fighters:

The fight for Mosul has been expected for some time and the U.S. military has built up logistics and command and control capabilities at nearby bases to assist the Iraqis in their fight. Army Col. Brett G. Sylvia commands some of the soldiers operating in Northern Iraq. He sent a Facebook update to the 2nd Brigade Combat Team “STRIKE,” 101st Airborne Division’s families on Oct. 3 to prepare them for the Battle of Mosul:

The tireless work of STRIKE Soldiers has set the conditions for the final push against Daesh in Iraq. In the coming months, your Soldiers will advise and assist the Iraqi army from disparate locations, working together as one team towards the final objective: the liberation of Mosul, defeat of this cowardly enemy, and the establishment of a stable environment for the peace loving citizens of Iraq.

American, Iraqi, Kurdish, and other forces are expected to slowly push ISIS from the city in the coming weeks.

Do Not Sell My Personal Information