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Here's what it took to pull off the Commander-in-Chief Forum


(Photo: Ward Carroll)

Just over two weeks after the Commander-in-Chief Forum aired during prime time on NBC, IAVA chief Paul Rieckhoff is still recovering from the event, riding the high of having had a big hand in pulling it off but also weathering a substantial wave of social media criticism -- much of it from fellow veterans -- about how it fell short.

 

 

"What the critics don't understand is events like this are a four-way negotiation," Rieckhoff says over the phone while riding an Uber between Newark Airport and Manhattan after attending a "VetTogether" -- a gathering of IAVA members -- at comedienne Kathy Griffin's home in Los Angeles. "It's us, the network, and each of the candidates. Anybody can walk away at any time. Concessions are made on all sides to pull it off."

Rieckhoff and his team started planning the forum about two years ago using Pastor Rick Warren's "Conversation on Faith" as a model.

"He brought the candidates to his church one after another for a one-on-one conversation," he says. "It was widely watched and really drove the issues front and center."

The IAVA wishlist had a few key elements: It should take place around 9-11. It should take place in New York City "because of the media traction," Rieckhoff says. And it should take place aboard the USS Intrepid, the retired aircraft carrier docked on the Hudson River at midtown.

They also knew it needed to happen before the final three debates.

(Photo: Ward Carroll)

"We're politically savvy enough to know that's it's all about the art of the possible," Rieckhoff says. "The idea that you're going to get the candidates for three hours and get everything you want is not grounded in the reality of the landscape.

"The idea was straightforward," he continues. "Bring together the candidates where vets could ask the questions on as big a stage as possible. Respect to the American Legion and VFW, but nobody watches their conventions but them."

Two cable networks expressed interest in airing the event, but Rieckhoff held out for something bigger.

"It needed to be as big as possible in order to attract the candidates," he says.

In early May NBC offered an hour in primetime. Another major network indicated interest but "dawdled," as Rieckhoff puts it, so IAVA accepted NBC's offer. Right before Memorial Day both candidates agreed to participate. But at that point, the work was only starting.

"It was a constant negotiation with the campaigns right up to the event itself," Rieckhoff says. "They were always threatening to pull out if they didn't get what they wanted."

And among the negotiations was agreeing to who the host would be. IAVA made a few suggestions, NBC personalities with some experience in the defense and foreign policy realms. The network and campaigns came up with their own option.

"The campaigns preferred not to have hard-hitting questions, and NBC wanted somebody who'd resonate during primetime," Rieckhoff says. "Suffice it to say Matt Lauer was not IAVA's choice."

(Photo: Ward Carroll)

But Matt Lauer got the nod, and for the first hour of the Commander-in-Chief Forum, he fumbled his way through the format, dedicating a disproportionate amount of time to issues other than those of critical importance to the military community. His poor performance in the eyes of viewers even spawned a hashtag: #LaueringTheBar.

 

 

"We would've like the opportunity to separate foreign policy from veteran's policy," Rieckhoff says. "Matt Lauer found that out the hard way."

But beyond that Rieckhoff is pleased with the outcome of the forum.

"Plenty of folks may be criticizing the event or the host," he says. "But the bottom line is every critic or whatever got an opportunity to talk about their perspective on the issues because this thing happened."

The broadcast was viewed by 15 million people, and Rieckhoff believes that the overall impact needs to be framed in terms much bigger than that.

"The reach has to be considered beyond the ratings of the show itself," he says. "It was the entire day prior, the day of, and at least one day afterward where every morning show, every newspaper, and every columnist was writing about vet issues."

That sense is shared by IAVA board member Wayne Smith, an Army vet who served as a combat medic during the Vietnam War and went on to be one of the founders of the Vietnam Veterans of America. He was seated in the crowd during the forum.

"I come from a generation of war vets who had no voice for decades, who were rejected by vets from previous wars not to mention the nation at large," Smith says. "I was blown away by the brilliance of this forum, this first time we had the undivided attention of both candidates. I hope this is the first of many."