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Here's what you need to know about Kim Jong Un's missile arsenal

Upon taking the highest office in the land, President-elect Donald Trump will need to address the growing North Korean missile threat "almost immediately."


"More often than not, we measure the mettle of presidencies by the unexpected crises that they must deal with," said Victor Cha, a senior adviser and the Korea Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. "For President Bush, this was clearly the terrorist attacks of 9/11, which completely changed every element of his presidency. For President-elect Trump, this crisis could very well come from North Korea."

Also read: Former US general calls for pre-emptive strike on North Korea

Speaking on a panel at CSIS's Global Security Forum, Cha added that the North would "challenge the new administration almost immediately upon taking office."

The normally aggressive regime has been exceptionally busy in 2016 with an increased tempo in testing. The North has launched 25 ballistic missiles this year and remains the only country to have detonated nuclear devices in this century.

"Every launch that he launches, he learns more. He gets more capability," retired US Army Gen. Walter "Skip" Sharp, a former commander of US Forces-Korea said during the panel.

"UN Security Council resolutions have been numerous that have told him he cannot do this, and I personally think it's time to start enforcing this," Sharp said.

The acceleration and frequency in testing shows not only the North's nuclear ambitions but also that the rogue nation has developed something of an arsenal.

The following graphic from CSIS's Missile Defense Project illustrates specifications and ranges of North Korea's ballistic-missile arsenal.

Center for Strategic and International Studies/Missile Defense Project

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