Articles

How this Marine inched his way to knock out a Japanese machine gunner

On May 1, 1945, the 5th Marine Regiment arrived at the Shuri line in Okinawa, Japan, to support the war-torn 27th Army Infantry Division. As the Marines patrolled the dangerous area, a Japanese machine gunner opened fire on the incoming grunts, killing three and wounding a few others.


After taking cover, Sgt. Romus "R.V." Burgin decided that he needed to take action and bring the fight to the enemy.

"I was with some of those Marines out there for two and a half years, and whenever somebody gets hit it's just like your family," Burgin states in an interview. "That's when I decided he needed knocking out right quick."

Related: This is how the first Asian-American Marine officer saved 8,000 men

At that moment, the Japanese machine gunner was completely hidden, and Burgin needed to locate the threat immediately. He knew what direction the incoming fire came from but he needed to acquire a proper distance to call in for support.

Burgin stepped out into the open and proceeded in the direction of the shooter, hoping to spot the enemy gunner's muzzle flash — and making himself a target.

After a few steps, the brave Marine's plan began to work, drawing the enemy's fire once again. Burgin dodged the incoming fire, two rounds ripped through his dungarees — but the quick-footed Marine was safe.

Little did the Japanese gunner know, he'd just given away his position. Burgin spotted his target and called in the enemy's coordinates for a mortar strike.

Also Read: 9 things you should know before becoming a Marine infantry officer

After the first round missed, the Marine made a slight adjustment and scored a direct hit with the second attempt.

"I got a direct hit with the second round. Machine gun went forward and the [enemy] went backwards," he said.

Check out the American Heroes Channel's video to see this outstanding Marine take out an enemy gunner for yourself.

(American Heroes Channel, YouTube)
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