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5 insane military projects that almost happened

1. Winston Churchill's plan for a militarized iceberg

Everyone knows that Winston Churchill is a certifiable badass — his military strategy in WWII led to the Allied victory over the Nazi Regime, and has secured him a spot amongst history's greatest leaders.


What few people know, however, is that Churchill's most glorious military scheme never saw the light of day — and for good reason. It was insane. What exactly was the Bulldog's grand plan, you ask? To create the largest aircraft carrier the world had ever seen, and to make it out of ice.

Yes, you read that right. Churchill's dream was to create a 2,000 foot long iceberg that would literally blow the Axis powers out of the water. The watercraft, dubbed Project Habakkuk, was going to be massive in every way: the construction plans called for walls that were 40 feet thick, and a keel depth of 200 feet — displacing approximately 2,00,000 tons of water. Habukkuk was no ice cube.

Eventually the Brits realized that frozen water may not be the hardiest building material, and opted to replace it with pykrete, a blend of ice and wood pulp that could deflect bullets.

Despite the fact that this "plan" sounds like something out of a bad sci-fi movie, Habakkuk almost happened. It wasn't until a 60 foot long, 1,000 ton model was constructed in Canada that people realized how freaking expensive this thing would be — the 1940s were a strange time. A full-sized Habakkuk would cost $70 million dollars, and could only get up to about six knots. And at the end of the day, Germany could still potentially melt the thing, though it would probably take the rest of the war to make a dent in this glacier.

2. Napalm-packing suicide bomber bats

A bat bomb in action Photo: schoolhistory.org.uk

Fire bombs were a huge threat during the height of WWII, and an excellent weapon to wield against unwitting enemies. The horrific damage done to London and Coventry during the London Blitz is a prime example of the power this weapon of war had when used on England and other Allied nations.

Determined to one-up the Axis forces, President Franklin Roosevelt approved plans for an even better bomb — one that was smaller, faster, and ... furrier. That's right. The plan was to strap tiny explosives to tiny, live bats.

Why people thought this would be a good idea is anyone's guess. The guy who proposed the scheme wasn't even military — he was a dentist, and a friend of FDR's wife, Eleanor. But America didn't care about that. It was time to blow the crap out of Japan, and they were going to do it with the one weapon Japan didn't have — flying rodents.

FDR consulted with zoologist Donald Griffin for his professional opinion before giving an official green light, apparently worried this "so crazy it just might work" idea might just be plain-old insane.

Griffin was a little skeptical too, but ultimately thought the whole bat thing was too cool to pass on. "This proposal seems bizarre and visionary at first glance," he wrote in April 1942, according to The Atlantic, "but extensive experience with experimental biology convinces the writer that if executed competently it would have every chance of success." Aces, Griffin.

The official strategy was to attach napalm explosives to each individual bat, store about 1,000 bats in large, bomb-safe crates, and release about 200 of those cases from a B-29 bomber as it flew over Japanese cities. That meant up to 200,000 bats could be unleashed at once — which would be terrifying even if they weren't on a suicide mission.

After they were released into the air, these little angels of death would roost inside buildings on the ground. Then after a few hours their explosives would detonate, igniting the building and causing total chaos.

At least, that was the plan. In reality, the bats were a little too good at their job, and escaped to nest under an American Air Force base's airplane hanger during an experiment. You can guess how that went. Surprisingly, the incineration of the building didn't put a damper on the operation — people were just more convinced of the bats volatility, and excited to see them used in real combat.

Unfortunately (or fortunately, let's be real), the U.S. never got to add "weaponized bats" to its military repertoire. It was decided that equipping small flying animals with napalm bombs could yield unpredictable results, and the investment wouldn't be worth the possible military gains. Shocker.

3. The Gay Bomb that would cause enemies to "make love, not war"

Hindsight is always 20-20, but how anyone took this "military strategy" seriously is completely beyond us. In quite possibly the least politically-correct display of derring-do in American history, the U.S. prepared to take its enemies out in a way they would never expect — by turning them gay.

Let's take a moment to let that sink in. The United States of America, one of the most powerful countries in the world, was convinced that getting the enemy to "switch teams" was the key to military prowess. Oh, and did we mention this happened in 1994?

The Wright Laboratory proposed a project that would require six years of research and a $7.5 million grant to create this bomb, along with other bizarre ideas — including as a bomb that would cause insects to swarm the enemy. So they really had the best and brightest American minds on this thing.

The goal was to drop extremely powerful chemical aphrodisiacs on enemy camps, rendering the men too "distracted" to um ... leave their tents.

The project was still considered viable in 2002, when the proposal's findings were sent to the National Academy of Sciences.

At the time the Pentagon and the Department of Defence held that "homosexuality is incompatible with military service," consistent with Clinton's infamous "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy, so maybe the bomb wasn't completely crazy for the time period? Just kidding.

The gay bomb never got off the ground because researchers at the Wright lab discovered no such "chemical pheremones" existed, leaving the crazy idea with zero means to execute it. The Wright Lab did, however, win the IG Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 for its efforts, a tongue-and-cheek gesture from the Annals of Improbable Research.

 4. B.F. Skinner's pigeon-guided missile system

Photo: the brigade.com

WWII is a treasure trove of weird military experiments, and famed psychologist B.F. Skinner's contribution to the American cause may be one of the most bizarre.

The plan? Place live pigeons inside missiles, and train them to direct it to the correct target, ensuring that no target was missed. The target would be displayed on a digital screen inside the missile, and the pigeon would be trained to peck the target until the bomb would correct its course and start heading in the right direction.

Despite pretty hefty financial investment in the idea, it was ultimately decided that the time it would take to train the pigeons, and the fact that missiles would have to be updated with tiny screens for them to peck at, wasn't worth the trouble.

 5. America tried to take out the Viet Cong with clouds

Maybe Forrest Gump was experiencing Operation Popeye Photo: duels.net

This is one experiment that actually did happen, though that doesn't make it any less ridiculous than our other contenders. When people think of the American military's methods of  chemical warfare in Vietnam, Agent Orange is what immediately comes to mind — but this chemical wasn't the only weapon the U.S. employed in its battle against the Viet Cong. The CIA developed a strategy called cloud seeding in 1963, which would release chemicals into the air that would manipulate weather patterns, causing unusual amounts of rainfall for the surrounding area.

And we're not talking your run-of-the-mill thunderstorm, either. Vietnam gets a ridiculous amount of rain already (remember that clip from Forrest Gump?), so the U.S. needed weather that would literally wash away the Ho Chi Minh Trail. Or at least try to.

The mission, called Operation Popeye, involved dumping iodine and silver flares from cargo planes over Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam. Scientists predicted that these chemical agents would cause a surge in rainfall and even extend the monsoon period, screwing with the Viet Cong's communication networks and  basically making things more unpleasant for everyone involved.

The results weren't fantastic, but the U.S. didn't roll over. The operation continued for five years, undertaking over 2,000 missions and releasing nearly 50,000 cloud-seed chemicals throughout the trail.  Lack of results aside, the dedication is still impressive.

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