Articles

Meet the wounded Iraq war veteran being honored by ESPN


Next month, as Hollywood and professional athletes gather in Los Angeles to celebrate the year in sports, U.S. Army Veteran and VA employee Danielle Green will be honored at the 2015 ESPYS with the Pat Tillman Award for Service.

"As a teammate and soldier, Pat believed we should always strive to be part of something bigger than ourselves while empowering those around us," said Marie Tillman, president and co-founder of the Pat Tillman Foundation. "Danielle has been unwavering in her aspiration to lift others suffering from the physical and mental injuries of war. In Pat's name, we're proud to continue the new tradition of the Tillman Award, honoring Danielle for her service as a voice and advocate for this generation of veterans."

Green, who is now a supervisor readjustment counseling therapist at the South Vet Center located in South Bend, IN., said she was honored to receive the award and be a part of Tillman's legacy of selfless service.

"It means so much," she said. "You see so many negative stories revolving around suicide, PTSD and VA employees, but everyday my team and I work with Veterans who truly believe they are broken. We show them how much they have to offer, how they can heal and get them the help they need."

Green has seen her share of adversity. In 2004, a little more than a year after leaving her job as a schoolteacher to enlist as a military police, she found herself on the rooftop of an Iraqi Police station in the center of Baghdad.

She recalls the heat and the uneasy feeling she had when the normally lively neighborhood turned quiet. Suddenly a coordinated RPG attack on the station from surrounding buildings left her bleeding out and in shock.

"I didn't realize I was missing my left arm," she said. "I just remember being angry at the fact that I was going to die in Iraq."

She credits the quick response of her team and their proximity to the Green Zone to her survival. She believed her quiet prayers, asking for a second chance to live and tell her story, didn't hurt either.

"I learned to really value life that day," Green said. "You can be here today and gone tomorrow."

In the course of a few days, she went from a hot rooftop in Iraq to Walter Reed Medical Center. For eight months the former Notre Dame Basketball standout worked with physicians, nurses and occupational/physical therapists to recover from her injuries. The southpaw's loss of her dominant arm forced her to relearn daily tasks like writing, but through it all she continued to follow her dreams and found inspiration in those medical professionals around her. They never let her quit on herself, and while there was doubt and fear of what her life would be like after she was discharged from Walter Reed and the Army, she kept charting a path toward service.

After going back to school for her masters in counseling, and a short stint as an assistant athletic director at a college, Green found an opportunity to harness all of her experiences and assist fellow Veterans who were transitioning out of the military. By 2010, she had gone from being a patient to a catalyst for change for those seeking help at her local Vet Center.

"There was some doubt and self pity," she said. "I'd sometime look down at my arm and wonder what the purpose of it all was … But now I realize the importance of what I can do for my peers. It's challenging and rewarding, and I wouldn't have it any other way."

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This article originally appeared at VAntage Point Copyright 2014. Follow VAntage Point on Twitter.

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