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ISIS has come up with a new, more diabolical way to use drones in Mosul fight

The man in charge of waging war on ISIS explained during a teleconference with reporters Oct. 26 that Islamic State militants "make extensive use" of unmanned aircraft in their fight to keep territory in Iraq and the key city of Mosul.


Behold the dawn on Trojan Horse drones. (Photo from Friends of YPG YPJ)

The head of Combined Joint Task Force Inherent Resolve Lt. Gen. Stephen Townsend said the terrorists use the drones to video suicide strikes on Peshmerga and Iraqi forces, fly in unmanned planes to help target coalition positions and even use the drones to direct fires from mortars and rockets.

ISIS use of drones is "not episodic or sporadic, it's relatively constant," Townsend said. "We've seen them using drones to control and adjust indirect fires."

Townsend added that the bad guys are also getting into the armed drone game, with ISIS dropping "small explosive devices" from the UAVs over coalition bases and other targets.

"Those fortunately haven't had great effect," he said.

But what's really bugging him is a new more dastardly way ISIS is using drones.

"Recently we have seen what we think is a Trojan Horse kind of UAV or drone," Townsend said.

He went on to explain that Islamic State militants landed a UAV inside coalition lines. Thinking they'd gotten an intelligence boon. When the allied forces went out to recover the drone it was detonated remotely, injuring the troops.

"We expect to see more of this, and we've put out procedures for our forces to be on guard for this," Townsend said, adding that U.S. troops and others have downed many drones harassing coalition troops with small arms fire and electronic means, "with varying levels of success."

"We're working to try to find better solutions to this pretty thorny problem," he said.