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The legendary rock band KISS has surprising roots from World War II

The legendary rock band Kiss is known for their makeup, over-the-top stage show, and hits like "Rock 'n Roll All Night" and "Detroit Rock City."


They aren't known as historians, although two of the band's members — Gene Simmons and Tommy Thayer — have remarkable stories to tell about what their families went through during World War II. And equally remarkable is how these stories link the two members of Kiss to each other.

Backstage at a Kiss concert in northern Virginia in late July, lead guitarist Tommy Thayer talked about his father's military service. James B. Thayer retired as a brigadier general in the mid-60s, but in 1945 he was an first lieutenant in charge of an anti-tank mine reconnaissance platoon that made its way across France into southern Germany. The unit saw a lot of action, including battles with Waffen SS troops – among the Third Reich's most elite fighters – that involved bloody hand-to-hand combat.

As the platoon made its way farther south they stumbled upon the Mauthausen-Gusen concentration camp. "The SS had just fled," Tommy Thayer said. "They left behind 15,000 Hungarian-Jewish refugees who were in bad shape."

Ironically enough, based on time and location, among the refugees that U.S. Army Lieutenant Thayer liberated was most likely a family from Budapest that included a teenage girl who would later give birth Gene Simmons, Kiss' outspoken bassist and co-founder.

"My mother was 14-years-old when they took her to the camps of Nazi Germany," Simmons explained. "If it wasn't for America, for those who served during World War Two like James Thayer, I wouldn't be here."

As a result of this connection, the band has thrown its clout behind the Oregon Military Museum, which will be named in honor of the now 93-year-old Brigadier General Thayer. Tommy Thayer is on the museum's board, and the band recently played at a private residence in the greater Portland area to raise money and awareness for the effort.

"The idea that Americans enjoy the kind of life that the rest of the world is envious of is made possible – not by politicians – but by the brave men and women of our military," Simmons said. "The least we could do is have a museum."

"There is evil being done all over the world," Simmons said. "And the only thing that keeps the world from falling into complete chaos is our military."

Beyond supporting the Oregon Military Museum, in the years since 9-11, Simmons has worked as a military veteran advocate. Among some of his more high-profile efforts is the band's hiring of veterans to work as roadies for Kiss on tour.

While other celebrity vet charities could rightly be criticized as something between Boomer guilt and vanity projects, the bass guitarist's desire to help vets is fueled by what his mother's side of the family went through to make it to America a generation ago.

Simmons has a few things to say about national pride, something he thinks the country has lost a measure of.

"When I first came to America as an eight-year-old boy people were quiet when the flag was raised," Simmons said. "We all stood still."

To Simmons' eye that respect is lacking in too many Americans now, particularly younger Americans who are surrounded by information and media but may not appreciate the relationship between history and their daily lives.

"Just stop yakking for at least one minute," he said. "The rest of the day is all yours to enjoy all the benefits that the American flag gives you."

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