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Navy extends hardship duty pay for one year

The Department of Defense has approved the Navy's request for an extension to hardship duty pay for deployed sailors. Though the Navy requested the extra money for two years, the current funding expires in September, 2017, and does not include new money for Marines.


According to the Navy, an "extended deployment" consists of 221 consecutive days in an "operational environment" (aka: deployment), and the sailor assigned to those areas will earn $16.50 per day, "not to exceed $495 per month." That amount is not dependent on rank or time in service. (Photo from U.S. Navy)

"The Navy is in high demand and is present where and when it matters," said Vice Adm. Robert Burke, Chief of Naval Personnel. "Hardship Duty Pay - Tempo is designed to compensate sailors for the important roles they continue to play in keeping our nation safe during extended deployments around the globe."

A Marine Corps financial office source said the reason the authorization was only approved for a year has more to do with politics than logistics.

During an election year, it is difficult to get additional funding for programs, he said.

"There are going to be budget cuts across the whole of the federal government in order for any progress on the national debt to be made," the Marine financial office source said. "The next administration's defense and fiscal policies will ultimately determine the fate of [Hardship Duty Pay- Tempo]."

A Navy spokesman said the service has paid out nearly $16 million over two years to about 24,000 sailors from 1,129 commands or units.

"This is something that the Navy wants for our sailors as we believe it positively affects sailors' morale," said Lt. Cmdr. Nathan Christensen, spokesman for the Chief of Naval Personnel. "It's one small way to help them during long and difficult deployments away from home."

(Photo from U.S. Navy)

The Marine officer, however, was hopeful that "since it was reauthorized after its first go or 'trial run,' I think we can conclude that it was determined to be a success by our legislators in Congress and by the Department of the Navy's upper echelon decision makers. Thus, I'm optimistic that it will continue in the future."

Right now the reauthorization only applies to the Navy and does not include the Marine Corps. The same financial officer noted that though the extension of Hardship Duty Pay- Tempo does not apply to Leathernecks, he is hopeful that the Corps will issue its own extension.

The Marine finance officer didn't believe that the lack of guidance for Hardship Duty Pay for the Corps would be a morale hit.

"If it turns out that Marines are not given HDP-T, I'm sure there will be a small level of frustration at first," he said. "But Marines have always and will continue to put the needs of their country first, and are honored to do so. I have no doubt that what little frustration does occur will dissipate quickly."