Navy SEALs team up with Israeli special forces

Elite soldiers from the Israel Defense Forces’ Shayetet 13 special operations unit joined forces with U.S. Navy SEALS in late March for a joint exercise between the two allies.

According to an IDF statement, the exercise was designed to improve upon the operational capabilities of the special forces of the IDF and of the militaries of Israel’s allies, such as the United States. The drill also included knowledge sharing between fleets, strengthening of common language, and operational cooperation in the field.

On the Israeli side, a Saar 5 missile ship (Eilat), Naval Special Warfare vessels, and other navy crafts took part in the training event. Troops practiced parachuting over the sea and carrying out a nighttime raid on a ship and rescuing hostages in enclosed areas.

Israel, Juniper Falcon, training

Members of U.S. and Israeli Special Operations Forces prepare rigid-hulled inflatable boats prior to participating in a water jump training exercise in the Mediterranean Sea as part of Juniper Falcon 17, on March 27, 2017. (U.S. Army photo by SSG Russell Gilchrest)

Following the drill, the head of operations of the Israeli Navy, Rear Adm. Ido Ben Moshe, said that “the cooperation between the two fleets is reflected in annual drills, reciprocal visits and operational mutuality. During the joint exercises, professional relations are created that contribute to both sides on the strategic level.”

In 2016, IDF Special Forces and U.S. Marines held a joint military exercise in the Negev Desert in part aimed at coordinating techniques for combating terrorist activities. Dubbed ‘Noble Shirley,’ the drill involved special units from the Israeli Air Force and Navy, and ground forces.

During the drill, the troops practiced simulating helicopter landings behind enemy lines, urban warfare both above and below ground, as well as close-range combat and military takeover techniques. The troops also held exercises concentrating on medical response to injured troops in hostile territory as well as the coordination of U.S. and Israeli medical networks.

TOP ARTICLES
Why the Growler is the king of electronic warfare

The mission of the Boeing EA-18G Growler is to use jammers or HARMs to put the enemy's "eyes" out of commission and give allies an airborne advantage.

4 dangers medics face while deployed in combat

Medics are commonly targeted on the battlefield by enemies to take them out of the fight. Without the "Docs" around, the patrol can't correctly function.

5 reasons you should have enlisted as a 'Fister'

Maybe you're picking your MOS based off what you can get. Maybe you're choosing by cool points. When it comes to cool points, one MOS reigns: Fister.

This veteran's Korean-inspired hot sauce will blow your mind

Gochujang is going to be the flavor of 2018. Leave it to an Army Ranger to lead the way in creating one of the tastiest takes on the Korean sauce.

How a good carrier landing can go bad in a hurry

The most stressful time for a naval aviator isn't when he is being shot at by enemy aircraft, it's when he's trying to land on a carrier.

8 Christmas gift ideas for the Air Force

The United States Air Force takes on one of the most important Christmas missions of all - tracking Santa. So they deserve a lot of Christmas loot.

A box of gear from Alpha Outpost for the tactical vet in your life

CEO Daniel Alarik has made the domination of crowded fields into an art form. His latest venture, a tactical subscription box company, is the Mona Lisa.

How a Christmas-gift-to-be turned into a booming vet-owned business

Looking for the perfect gift for the salty veteran in your life and fast running out of ideas? Put those 72 koozies down and check out Medals of America.

This wounded warrior is turning steel into gold in Alabama

Colin Wayne went from an Army National Guardsman to a fitness model to...a steel worker? Wayne’s company, Redline Steel, creates art from steel.

3 leadership lessons that will take you from the battlefield to the boardroom

Col. Ted Studdard never imagined he'd have a 25-year career in the Marines, but he's got some pro tips to share now that he's a bonafide "mustang."