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Oldest female veteran dies at 108


Alyce Dixon-- 1907-2016. (Photo: VA)

Ms. Alyce Dixon, the oldest living female veteran well known for her 'elegant sense of style and repertoire of eyebrow raising jokes' died in her sleep at the Washington DC Veterans Affairs Medical Center's Community Living Center on January 27.

Brian Hawkins, the Medical Center director told a local news station: "She was one-of-a-kind; a strong-willed, funny, wise, giving and feisty WWII veteran. Her message touched a lot of people. It has been an honor to care for the oldest female veteran."

In a release to share the news of her death, the Washington DC VA Medical Center wrote the following:

At the medical center, she was affectionately called the "Queen Bee" and was known for impeccable dress. She never left her room without fixing her makeup and hair. She always wore stylish clothes and jewelry and sported well-manicured nails. She loved to sit in the medical center Atrium and watch the people.

Born Alice Lillian Ellis in 1907, the Boston native has always lived life on her own terms. At 16, she saw a movie starring actress Alyce Mills. "I thought it was so pretty spelled like that, so I changed my name to Alyce," she said.

One of the oldest of nine children, Ms. Dixon helped her mother raise her younger siblings. "After I got married, I never wanted children, I felt like I'd already raised a family," she told Vantage Point, the VA's official blog. Ms. Dixon would later divorce her husband over an $18 grocery allowance.

"I used to manage his paycheck until he found out I was sending money home to my family," she said. He then started managing the money and gave her an allowance, a move which did not sit well with the independent young woman. "I found myself a job, an apartment and a roommate. I didn't need him or his money," she said with no trace of regret in her voice.

In 1943, Dixon became one of the first African American women to join the Army. She served in the Women' s Army Corps where she was stationed in England and France with the 6888th Battalion. Her job was to ensure the 'backlog' of care packages and letters families were sending to their loved ones fighting on the front lines were delivered. After leaving the Army in 1946, she worked 35 more years for the federal government at the Census Bureau, and later for the Pentagon as purchasing agent - buying everything from pencils to airplanes.

Upon retiring in 1973, she served as a volunteer at local hospitals for 12 years. "I always shared what little I have, that's why He let me live so long," she said. "I just believe in sharing and giving. If you have a little bit of something and someone else needs it, share."

The centenarian recently offered thisĀ advice on aging: "Don' t worry about getting old, just live it up all the time."

Rest in peace, Queen Bee.

Watch this hilarious video of Alyce tellingĀ jokes:

Watch this video of Alyce's birthday party last year: