Articles

Paul Rieckhoff wants vets to help America 'bring the temperature down'

 


Paul Rieckhoff, IAVA CEO and founder, advocating for vets at the DNC in Philadelphia. (Photo: Ward Carroll)

PHILADELPHIA, Pa. -- If the 13 years of running Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America has taken an emotional and physical toll on founder and CEO Paul Rieckhoff, he doesn't show it. Watching him in action at the Democratic National Convention this week in Philadelphia is a study in determination and attention to detail. No bypassing staffer is too junior to be engaged, and no veterans issue is too trivial to be addressed.

"If you had asked me 13 years ago that if this far in the future it would still be this hard, I would have said you were full of it," Rieckhoff says. "Everything is still too hard, from getting candidates to say the right thing to reforming the VA."

He's also concerned that philanthropic organizations haven't responded to a national health problem that he compares to the AIDS crisis of the 1980s.

"This is like going to the convention in 1982 and people are kind of peripherally talking about AIDS when their friends are dying," he says. "So if we accept that 20 vets are dying a day as a base point, we're going to walk out of these conventions and the Rockefeller Foundation, the Gates Foundation, and these other billionaire philanthropic leaders are not going to be focused on veterans issues."

Rieckhoff spreads the blame for the lack of progress on veterans' issues -- heath care and beyond -- across several camps, starting with the commander-in-chief.

"President Obama has failed to provide the country a national strategy, and as a response, you've gotten fragmentation," he says. And, by his reckoning, that fragmentation has taken myriad forms, including divisions among the veteran community itself.

"Too often VSO are having tribal fights when we really should recognize that we're all really in deep shit because our demographics are our destiny and our demographics are bad," Rieckhoff warns.

He goes on to explain that the veteran community is about to experience a "tectonic shift" numbers-wise because the World War II generation is all but gone and the Vietnam War generation is dying fast.

"We're going to go from 12 percent in the population to, at some point, under five percent," he explains.

In the face of this reality, Rieckhoff says that veteran service organizations and, more broadly, veterans themselves need to unify.

"My big takeaway in the wake of these two conventions is we have to find ways to be united and focused and we have to find ways to multiply our impact," he says. "If veterans alone are carrying water for veterans' issues we will lose.  We're just too small. There aren't enough of us."

That's not to say that he doesn't think veterans have individual impact potential; in fact, Rieckhoff is quick to point out that vets are in a unique position nationwide right now.

"If you're a veteran and you walk into a Starbucks or a classroom and announce your status you're going to get 2 minutes of 'rock star' respect where people will listen to you for a little while before they jump into their corners for Bernie or Trump or whoever," he says. "But you have that opening that opportunity to try and be a leader and bring people together. That's what veterans need to be doing right now. We can bring the temperature down. We can do it through credibility and patriotism and through our example."

At the same time, Rieckhoff warns vets against being used as props.

"As a community, we have to be really wary about being used. If they want to throw you up on stage with someone, make sure that you're getting out of it what you need because they're going to get what they need," he says. "It's kind of like when you join the military, right? Uncle Sam's going to get what he needs out of you. Make sure you get what you need out of Uncle Sam."

The discussion pivots to the political sphere, and Rieckhoff is at once unflinching and bipartisan in his take on what's in play for the military community.

"The conventions have been fascinating to watch," he says. "I think what's happened in the last four years is both parties realize that veterans make good populism. Last week you had Joni Ernst and a wall of veterans, this week you'll have Seth Moulton and a wall of veterans. They know – Trump especially – that there is a huge populist undertone to everything veterans."

But Rieckhoff fears the community may be squandering its time in the spotlight.

"We have lacked a real sharp edge of activism," he says. "If this was 1968, vet protestors would be in the convention."

He introduces a broader theme, saying, "It's a very complicated psycho-social situation we're in where our community has been asked to sacrifice over and over again, but the public has reasoned that those in the military are self-selected as people who are willing to sacrifice over and over again. You can send us on 12 tours and we're not going to make that much of a stink.

"The bigger issue is the lack of precedent for the lack of involvement in our country in a time of war. There's no precedent in American history for this much war with this small group of people for this long."

That societal reality has yielded some things of concern, not the least of which, according to Rieckhoff, is the fact that there are very few veterans in positions of real power.

"None of the candidates in either party is a veteran," he points out. "Neither chairman of the VA on either the House or Senate side was a veteran. Jeff Miller and Bernie Sanders can't run around talking about how wonderful they were when they presided over the largest VA scandal in American history.

"Bernie Sanders used the scandal to pass the omnibus and Jeff Miller is running around with Trump, using his time on HVAC for that. That's politics, I get that. But At the end of the day veterans are still screwed."

Rieckhoff likens the situation to "asking a plumber to fix your television."

IAVA founder Paul Rieckhoff at the DNC in Philadelphia. (Photo: Ward Carroll)

He uses what's going on at the VA as an example, saying, "Bob McDonald is an army of one right now. He's getting his legs cut out from under him by the Republican congress and Democratic leadership won't touch him, so he's almost out of time. He's a good man who's tried, but likely he'll be out. The probability is we'll get a new VA secretary who'll get nominated in February or March, confirmed in March or April, and maybe he gets to work in June. So, six months into 2017, we'll have the vision of a new VA secretary."

Rieckhoff wants veteran leaders "who are still on the sidelines" to engage.

"There should be a coordinated and independent effort to recognize that these are trying times politically and we need to have a new call for these folks to serve," he says. "You had the 'Fighting Dems" in '06 and I told Rahm Emanuel that 'you have a political jump ball here,' and he didn't see it.

"The Fighting Dems wasn't started by the party; it was started by that crew – Patrick Murphy and Tammy Duckworth and Joe Sestak. That was the first iteration. Four years later the Republicans had their own round, but there was never really a coordinated campaign by either party to recruit veterans. There was a coordinated campaign to push out veterans and to celebrate veterans, but there's not actually a farm team."

Rieckhoff goes further, actually recommending a ticket that a large percentage of veterans would support right out of the gate.

"If [former NYC mayor] Mike Bloomberg and [retired Admiral and former CJCS] Mike Mullen started their own party tomorrow, a third of our membership would go with them . . . probably a third of the country would go with them," he opines.

Rieckhoff sums the landscape up as "crazier," and, again, he believes that presents a unique opportunity for the military/veteran community.

"We're some of the only people who can go to both conventions and understand both sides," he says. "That's the powerful position for us whether it's gun control, immigration, Islamophobia, gay rights, marijuana, or whatever. We can be a unique bridge builder between both sides. The Black Lives Matter and Blue Lives Matter movements are great examples. The veterans community is on both sides of those."

For all of the impact potential veterans might have, Rieckhoff is also mindful of negative stereotypes that exist among the civilian populations, something he blames in large part to "media laziness."

"The only description the media had of the Dallas shooter was that he was African-American, and he was a veteran," he points out. "Why? Because they have to file a story quickly and those were the only two things they could verify. That accelerated media cycle perpetuates lazy reporting. And when you have a vet who fits the stereotype they run with it."

Rieckhoff exhales and contemplates the requirement to constantly attend to the pubic's perception of vets, and that reminds him of the accomplishments of the community and, specifically, the legacy of IAVA.

"When IAVA started in 2004 the veterans landscape was a desert," he remembers. "Now it's a metropolis. We are very proud of the fact that a lot of people who come through the IAVA team have gone on to do really cool stuff."

A quick review of the current roles of IAVA alums bears this out. Vet leaders like Abdul Henderson (now on the Congressional Black Caucus), Bill Rausch (now at Got Your 6), Tom Taratino (Twitter), Matt Miller (Trump campaign), and Todd Bowers (Uber) all spent time on the IAVA staff.

"We built IAVA to be a launching pad," Rieckhoff says. "I'd rather have Tom Taratino at Twitter changing the culture than have him at the House VA Committee talking to a bunch of other veterans for the ninetieth time."

But in spite of the challenges, Rieckhoff is bullish on the future of the veteran community.

"In 10 years, disproportionally CEOs are going to be veterans, candidates are going to be veterans, entrepreneurs are going to be veterans," he says. "And that's going to be exciting to watch."

Humor

The truth about cell phones in Basic Training

Thank god you got out when you did! The moment you received your DD-214, it was officially an end of an era. Hopefully, your branch won't fall victim like all those other, weaker branches did. It's Lord of the Flies in here.

New recruits are arriving in droves and they're pulling out their cell phones to record themselves talking back to their drill sergeants. If the drill sergeants have a problem with it, they whip out their stress cards, go back to eating their Tide Pods, and continue listening to their music (which, coincidentally, has gotten progressively worse since your generation, too).

Keep reading... Show less
Articles

How R. Lee Ermey's Hollywood break is an inspiration to us all

While there have been many outstanding actors and celebrities who have raised their right hand, there has never been a veteran who could finger point his way to the top of Hollywood stardom quite like the late great Gunnery Sergeant R. Lee Ermey.

Keep reading... Show less
Military Life

5 reasons your troops are more important than promotion

If there's one complaint common across the military, it's that commanders too often care more about their careers than the well-being of their troops. It's problematic when higher-ups are willing to put lower enlisted through hell if it means they look good at the end of the day.

Keep reading... Show less
Military Life

'Operation Cure Boredom' is a funny, unrepentant look back at life in the 1990s Air Force

The following is an excerpt from the first book by Air Force veteran and Hollywood writer Dan Martin. Titled Operation Cure Boredom, it's a hilarious collection of short stories chronicling the adventures of Martin's 1990-1994 enlistment in the world's best Air Force.

This chapter, called "Guest on the Range," is about the extraordinary lengths Martin went to in order to qualify on the firing range as a junior enlisted Crew Chief.

Keep reading... Show less
Military Life

The top 6 reasons people decide to join the infantry

Deciding to join the military is a huge step for anyone looking to make a life-altering change. One of the most appealing aspects of becoming a member of the armed forces is the vast array of professional opportunities the service offers.

You can sign up, ship out, and, within a few short months, be guarding a military installation as your newfound brothers- and sisters-in-arms sleep.

Keep reading... Show less
GEAR & TECH

These high-tech glasses could change how sailors train

Training has evolved over the years but the core elements have always remained the same. There's an instructor and a bunch of students. They go over material, both in theory and in practice, mastering the skills required by the job. But no matter how good the teacher, students will always need a refresher from time to time. So, that means it's time to go back to school — or does it?

Now, mixed-reality technology — including smart glasses — could change the way sailors learn the skills they need to serve.

Keep reading... Show less
Entertainment

6 US conflicts that would (probably) make terrible video games

When developers set out to make video games, their focus should always primarily be on crafting a fun and engaging experience. Oftentimes, you'll see video games set far in the future so that developers can place an arsenal of advanced, sci-fi weaponry in the hands of the player — because it's fun. Other times, they'll take cues from real wars and toss the player directly into the heat of a historical battle — because that's fun, too.

Keep reading... Show less
Tactical

How to start a fire with only one hand

Heading out into the wilderness for a camping trip is exhilarating and refreshing. Starting a campfire and roasting some marshmallows under the stars is a great way to get in touch with Mother Nature. Although the idea of spending a night in the great outdoors sounds incredible, campers should always remember to bring specific tools and learn important survival skills in the event they sustain an injury and help is far, far away.

It gets cold out there at night, so it's important to know the basics of starting a fire to keep warm — even in the dire circumstance that you've been injured. Do you know how to start a fire with just one hand? You never know — this skill might just save your life.

Keep reading... Show less