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Quadruple amputee Travis Mills wows the crowd with appearance on 'Ellen' show

Retired Army Staff Sergeant Travis Mills went out on a foot patrol on April 10, 2012. It was his third tour in Afghanistan. He woke up on his 25th birthday to find that he'd stepped on on improvised explosive device, or IED, and that he'd suddenly become a quadruple amputee.


David Vobora was an NFL athlete who'd been dubbed "Mr. Irrelevant" after being the last draft pick of the season in 2008. While playing for the Seattle Seahawks, Vobora blew out his shoulder. It would ultimately force him to retire from the NFL at just 25 years old.

In the intervening years, Mills and Vobora forged an unlikely friendship.

"I had 25 good years with my arms and legs, and now I got the rest of my life to still keep living and pushing forward," Mills said during an interview on "The Ellen Degeneres Show" yesterday.

"Something was missing," Vobora, who is now a personal trainer, said. He noted that his work with professional athletes and wealthy clients was failing to fill a void in his life.

When Vobora met Mills, "I just knew I had to work with him."

Mills talks about his predicament with lots of humor. When thanked for his heroism, Mills somewhat shrugs and replies, "I didn't do more than anyone else. I just had a bad day at work, you know; a case of the Mondays."

His wife, with whom he is expecting their second child, is equally humorous. "I'm in it for the handicapped parking," Mills quotes her as having said shortly after his leg had to be amputated.

Vobora combined his research into the training he'd done with professional athletes with Mills' experience at Walter Reed to build two non-profits: The Travis Mills Foundation and The Adaptive Training Foundation.

Both men were gifted with generous checks from Ellen and Walmart for their foundations.