Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition - We Are The Mighty
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Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition

Army Capt. Rebecca Murga had the same goals as anyone else at gear turn-in after deployment: get rid of this sh*t and get back home. But she made a rookie mistake when she left Afghanistan without double-checking her gear against her clothing list.


Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
Capt. Rebecca Murga tries to find a missing Gore-Tex item while turning in items at the Central Issue Facility. (Go90 No Sh*t There I Was screenshot)

That’s how she ended up at the Central Issue Facility with a desperate need to go home and no Gore-Tex. And since Army property values never match civilian price points, she’s left with the option of paying hundreds of dollars or weaving a Gore-Tex from cobwebs and unicorn dreams.

Anyone who has dealt with DoD civilians knows that it’s a recipe for frustration, but Murga manages to smooth talk her way through the facility only to find herself faced with something worse.

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
Something much, much worse. (Go90 No Sh*t There I Was screenshot)

See how Murga’s conscience clouds her homecoming in the No Sh*t There I Was episode embedded at the top.

Watch more No Sh*t There I Was:

This is a perfect example of how ridiculous boot camp is

This is why the military shouldn’t completely outlaw hazing

Why you should never run through smoke you didn’t throw

That time Linda Hamilton asked a Marine to the ball

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11 fighter pilot rules that can be applied to everyday life


Fighter pilots have a lot of cool sayings like, “Don’t ask somebody if he’s a fighter pilot. If he is, he’ll tell you. If he’s not, why embarrass him?” and “Faster fighters, older whiskey, younger women,” but not all of these can be applied to real life.

Fortunately, they also have a few saying that can be applied to real life. Here are 11 of them:

1. Train like you fight

This saying was made popular by “Duke” Cunningham, Navy Vietnam-era ace who served a stint in federal prison for misdeeds committed while serving as a congressman from California. It seems obvious, but think of how many processes your organization has that don’t really matter when it comes to executing the mission.

2. Don’t be both out of airspeed and ideas

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
U.S. Navy

That’s a bad combo. As Dean Wormer said in the movie “Animal House,” “Fat, dumb, and stupid is no way to go through life, son.”

3. Keep your knots up

Speed is life. It gives you options. In business “speed” can be resources, revenue, people. Having X+1 is a good idea.

4. Keep your scan going

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
U.S. Navy

If you’re only focused on one thing, something else is about to jump up and bite you. While you’re staring at the bandit in the heads-up display, you’re missing the fact you’re about to run out of gas or get shot by the other bandit who just rolled in behind you.

5. Lost sight, lost fight

Regardless of Gucci technology or whatever, you can’t kill what you can’t see.

6. You can only tie the record for low flight

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Bennie J. Davis III

So don’t fly into the ground.

7. There’s no kill like a guns kill

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
U.S. Air Force photo by Todd Cromar

This is as pure as it gets for a fighter pilot. Feels. So. Good. And, remember, stealth doesn’t work against bullets.

8. Don’t turn back into a fight you’ve already won

Know when to bug out and then do it. Live to fight another day.

9. You miss 100 percent of the shots you don’t take

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
(U.S. Air Force photo by Tom Reynolds)

You also miss 100 percent of the shots you take out of the missile’s operating envelope . . . which gets back to No. 1: Train like you fight.

10. A letter of reprimand is better than no mail at all

As John Paul Jones once said, “He who will not risk, cannot win.” Nobody ever made history or changed the world by only worrying about his or her career.

11. If you know you’re about to die, make your last transmission a good one

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition

No whining. Just key the radio and say, “Have a beer on me, boys.”


Feature image: DoD photo/ Staff Sergeant Alexander Cook

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USS Cole steams back to site of deadly 2000 suicide attack

The Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG 67) probably wouldn’t be blamed for not wanting to sail off the coast of Yemen. But in the wake of an attack on a Saudi frigate, the Cole is patrolling the waters near the war-torn country where she was attacked by a suicide boat in 2000.


That attack killed 17 sailors, wounded 39 and tore a hole in the hull that measured 40 feet by 60 feet. A 2010 Navy release noted that the Cole took 14 months to repair. That release also noted that the Cole’s return to Norfolk came through the Bab el Mandab, near the location where the Saudi frigate was attacked.

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
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The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Mahan (DDG 72) and USS Cole (DDG 67) maneuver into position behind three Japanese destroyers during a photo exercise. USS Cole is in the center of the photograph. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tim Comerford/Released)

According to a report by FoxNews.com, the Cole’s mission is to maintain “freedom of navigation” in the region. In the past, things have gotten rough during the innocuous-sounding “freedom of navigation” missions.

The region has already seen some shots taken at the guided-missile destroyer USS Mason (DDG 87) on three occasions, prompting a retaliatory Tomahawk strike from the destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94). The attacks on the Mason, the Saudi frigate, and the former US Navy vessel HSV-2 Swift were blamed on Iranian-sponsored Houthi rebels. The attacks on USS Mason used Iranian-made Noor anti-ship missiles, a copy of the Chinese C-802.

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
More than 100 midshipmen man the rails for a photo on the foícísle of the guided-missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG 67) during the 2016 Professional Training for Midshipmen (PROTRAMID) Surface week. USS Cole has deployed off the coast of Yemen, where the ship was attacked in 2000. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ryan Seelbach)

Iran has been quite aggressive in recent months, making threats to American aircraft in the Persian Gulf. There have been a number of close encounters between American ships and Iranian speedboats as well. In one case this past August, the Cyclone-class patrol ship USS Squall (PC 7) fired warning shots at Iranian vessels. Last month, the guided-missile destroyer USS Mahan (DDG 72) also was forced to fire warning shots at Iranian speedboats.

Articles

Combat-veteran Joey Jones highlights FOX News 9/11 coverage

On Saturday, September 11, 2021, America will observe the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks which changed the world as we know it. Retired Marine Staff Sgt. Joey Jones, a FOX News contributor, is proud of the network’s commitment to ensuring America never forgets. 

The network launched almost 25 years ago and remains a dominant force in the news media. Jones is not only a regular contributor for the channel but also hosts a variety of shows through FOX Nation. And for him, it’s more than a job. 

“A lot has happened in 25 years. We’ve fought a few wars, had two presidents impeached, Cinderella stories in sports and in life. Now we’ve even survived a massive pandemic,” he said. “As a 35-year-old veteran, FOX has been there my entire adult life helping provide the coverage necessary to be informed and form my own opinions. And we’re just getting started.”

Severely injured in Afghanistan while deployed with the Marine Corps as an IED tech, Jones has made a name for himself on the network alongside veterans like Pete Hegseth. Viewers often hear both vets share first-hand accounts of war and the unseen impacts it can have. For the anniversary of 9/11, Jones explained the importance of its coverage. 

“Fox is based in NYC. The people I work with were there when the towers fell, so many of them lost friends and loved ones,” he shared. “When you walk in the building at 1211 Ave of the Americas, you feel patriotism beaming from the security guards, hair and make-up pros, all the way to the production staff. As on-air talent it’s my job to do them justice every day, not just the week of 9/11 — but it’s definitely felt more than just on this anniversary.”

The lineup of programming for the weekend of remembrance is extraordinary. 

It began with Hegseth contributing to FOX and Friends morning show on September 10. As a former infantry Captain in the Army National Guard who deployed for the War on Terror multiple times, the significance of the day is always felt, he had said. Hegseth broadcasted his reflections live from lower Manhattan at a location overlooking the National September 11 Memorial at Ground Zero. 

Harris Faulkner, a self-proclaimed military brat and host of The Faulkner Focus (which airs at 11am eastern during the week) featured interviews from NYPD officers to share perspective on the somber day. The intentional focus and commitment will continue throughout the evening.

On the day of the anniversary, viewers have an intense lineup of specials to commemorate the day beginning with an 8am EST moment of silence. The news programming throughout the day will be live from lower Manhattan. On FOX Nation, viewers can see Lost Calls of 9/11, including I Can Hear You: President Bush at Ground Zero hosted by Martha MacCallum. 

Countdown Bin Laden presented by FOX News Sunday anchor Chris Wallace will be available on Sunday, September 12 through FOX Nation. The program tells the story of August 27, 2010, when three CIA officers met with then-Director Leon Panetta about a courier with deep Al Qaeda ties and a connection to a mysterious three-story compound at the end of a dead-end street in Abbottabad, Pakistan.

Those who listen to podcasts can head over to FOX News Audio for FOX News Rewind: 9/11, which looks back on the events leading up to the attack. 

With the recent fall of Afghanistan to the Taliban, Jones said he recognizes the increased intensity of the day for veterans and Americans. But within the emotions he feels there’s an opportunity.

“I think we need to take inventory of our lives. Realize the drastic and dramatic changes still felt from the day,” he implored. “The memories of those we lost are felt in our daily loves not just enshrined in stone or media. We need to honor them every single day.”

Those unable to watch coverage live can see the footage as well as all 9/11 programming through their app by signing up for FOX Nation. Military members and veterans receive this benefit completely free of charge for an entire year as a part of FOX News’ commitment to serve those who serve. 

Articles

The Air Force just escalated its war with the airlines

The Air Force has just escalated its response to efforts by the airlines to hire away military pilots. They’re throwing huge retention bonuses to the pilots and boosting flight pay to $1,000 a month.


According to a report by BreakingDefense.com, the flight pay boost will add an additional $1,800 a month to the paychecks of officers. Enlisted men will see their flight pay go from $400 to $600 a month, a 50 percent increase, and taking their pay up $2,400 a year.

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
Maj. Kurt Wampole, assisted by Capt. Matt Ward, 774th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron pilots, taxis a C-130H Hercules back to its parking spot. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Ben Bloker.)

“We need to retain our experienced pilots and these are some examples of how we’re working to do that,” said Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson in an Air Force release. “We can’t afford not to compensate our talented aviators at a time when airlines are hiring unprecedented numbers.”

In addition to announcing the increased flight pay, Secretary Wilson announced the creation of an “Aircrew Crisis Task Force” under Brig. Gen. Michael G. Koscheski. This task force’s formation is a sign that the pilot shortage the Air Force is facing has not improved. The Air Force release noted that at the end of Fiscal Year 2016, the Air Force was short 1,555 pilots overall, including 1,211 fighter pilots.

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
An F-16 Fighting Falcon pilot, assigned to Detachment 1, 138th Fighter Wing, dons his helmet in preparation of a barnstorming performance for reporters, Feb. 1, 2017, in Houston. (U.S. Air National Guard photo/Tech. Sgt. Drew A. Egnoske)

The Air Force is looking to bring back 25 retired pilots to fill staff positions through the Voluntary Rated Return to Active Duty program, allowing pilots who are still current to be returned to front-line duties. The staff positions are non-flying, but retired pilots could have sufficient expertise to handle them.

This past June, the Air Force increased its Aviation Bonus cap from $25,000 a year to $35,000. These bonuses are paid to pilots who commit to stay past their service commitment for up to nine years.

The Air Force was also seeking to reduce the number of non-flying assignments for pilots, including headquarters positions and developmental opportunities. The Air Force is also trying to reduce additional units and add more flexibility for Airmen with families and children.

WATCH

This video shows a bizarre part of North Korean fighter pilot training

The 24-hour Korean-language YTN News Network based in Seoul, South Korea broadcasted video of North Korean dictator and alleged Swiss chocolate enthusiast Kim Jong Un looking at the “unusual” fighter training methods of the North Korean Air Force.


The video, from North Korea’s Korean Central News Agency, the media mouthpiece of the regime, shows pilots using what looks like cardboard cutouts of their cockpits along with toy fighter models, walking over a large map of the country.

The training is purportedly for what the pilots should do in a low fuel situation, which probably happens a lot in the North.

Kim is not only watching the pilots train. It’s customary for the dictator, like his father Kim Jong-Il, and grandfather Kim Il-Sung before him, to administer “on the spot guidance.” The dictators conduct what are known as business inspections. They visit critical areas of the North Korean defense, industrial, and agricultural centers, and offer advice on how to better perform their job functions.

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition

This is why so many photos of the leaders include them standing around talking while any number of aides are standing around taking notes. Accompanying military officers and leaders of the local area are expected to take meticulous notes of everything the leader says. When the guidance is given, it is usually memorialized with a plaque, including a quote from the leader’s advice.

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
Kim Jong-il visited the Songjin Iron and Steel Complex in the city of Kim Chaek, making that day either the best or worst of that factory worker’s life.

MIGHTY BRANDED

This NFL star trying to eat an MRE will crack you up

For a special tribute to the troops during the NFL’s Salute to Service month, Washington Redskins tight end Vernon Davis joined a few military members and Redskins special teams coordinator and former Army Apache pilot Ben Kotwica for what he thought was going to be a normal meal.


However, little did Vernon know that while the military members would be treated to a regular meal, Vernon would get a literally get a “taste” of military life, chowing down on a standard-issue Meal Ready to Eat, or MRE.

In a meal filled with laughter, Vernon dutifully tries to assemble his MRE, gaining a first-hand appreciation for our nation’s service members.  The experience was hosted by USAA, the Official Military Appreciation Sponsor of the NFL, as part of its commitment to bringing authentic football experiences directly to the military.

Articles

The 13 funniest military memes of the week

Another week down, another (long) weekend to get through without a major safety incident or an article 15. Good luck.


1. Terrorists have learned to fear American training (via Team Non-Rec).

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition

2. When corporals know they’re no longer worth the paperwork (via Marine Corps Memes).

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
Easier to let him EAS than to bother ninja punching him.

SEE ALSO: 12 signs you may be ‘motarded’

3. When you want those stripes but you’re just a hero, not a college grad (via Sh-t My LPO Says).

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition

4. The Navy boot camp honor grads are now labeled with a special ribbon (via Sh-T My LPO Says).

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
You better stand at parade rest for him, fleet.

5. How the Coast Guard earns their deployment stripes (via Military Memes).

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
One stripe for every 12 hours on the open sea.

6. “Fully retired? I can finally get around to that education the Army promised me.”(via Team Non-Rec).

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
College. It’s like 4 years of briefings.

7. Gotta love that Air Force life (via Air Force Memes and Humor).

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
Airman are the most hardened warriors at the juice and snack bar.

8. Dressing your baby in an adorable sailor outfit has consequences (via Sh-t My LPO Says).

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy material right there.

9. “Let me tell you ’bout my best friend …”

(via Team Non-Rec).

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
Later, those Marines will take a beach trip as well.

10. “Ha ha, lieutenants get people lost.”

(Via Devil Dog Nation.)

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
How is this not the driver’s fault?

11. Why military travel works so well (via Air Force Memes and Humor).

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
Pretty sure Lucifer designed more than one thing in the military.

 12. When you have to switch out your camping tents for DRASH tents (via Terminal Lance).

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
The commander really does just like to see you cry.

13. When your article 15 rebuttal doesn’t go as planned (via Air Force Memes and Humor).

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition

NOW: 5 cocktails with military origins

OR: The top 10 deadliest snipers of all time

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These 3 snipers had more kills than Carlos Hathcock in Vietnam

While Carlos Hathcock is perhaps the most famous sniper of the Vietnam War, he actually ranks fourth in the number of confirmed kills.


Yeah, that’s right. Hathcock was out-scored by three other snipers during that conflict. So, who are the guys who bested Hathcock’s 93 confirmed sniper kills? Let’s take a look at them.

 

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
Carlos Hathcock | Photo: Marine Corps Archives

 

3rd place: Eric R. England – 98 confirmed kills

The Union County Historical Society reports that Eric England had his service in Vietnam cut short at seven months.

England also had a lengthy track record of success in competitive shooting, including winning the Leech Cup — the oldest competitive shooting trophy in the United States.

England rates as perhaps the most obscure of the snipers who out-shot Hathcock. Aside from some photos taken during the 2011 Memorial Day Parade in Union County, Georgia, few, if any, photos of this legend are publicly available.

Second Place: Chuck Mawhinney – 103 confirmed kills

Chuck Mawhinney served from 1967-1970 in the Marine Corps. According to a 2000 Los Angeles Times article, he spent 16 months in Vietnam. After leaving the Marine Corps, he worked in the United States Forest Service.

Mawhinney’s youth was spent hunting, and he chose the Marines because they allowed him to delay his entry until after deer season. Some Marine recruiter did his country a service with that call.

Mawhinney noted that every one of his kills had a weapon — with one notable exception: A North Vietnamese Army paymaster who he took out from 900 yards away.

Today, Mawhinney is talking about what he has done, seeking to dispel the many stereotypes of snipers that are in people’s minds.

 

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
This is the M40 sniper rifle used by Chuck Mawhinney during the Vietnam War. (Photo from Wikimedia Commons)

 

1st Place: Adelbert Waldron — 109 confirmed kills

America’s top sniper of the Vietnam War wasn’t a Marine. He served with the 9th Infantry Division of the United States Army. Yeah, you read that right. Marines got all the press and the glory, but an Army guy was the top sniper shot of the Vietnam War.

Waldron had served in the United States Navy for 12 years before going to civilian life. In 1968, he enlisted in the Army. SniperCentral.com noted that Waldron spent 16 months in Vietnam. Waldron primarily used the M21 Sniper Weapon System, a modified M14.

Waldron was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross twice. He also was awarded the Silver Star and three Bronze Stars. Still, he never talked about his service with the media, and died in 1995. His total would be the top score for an American sniper until Chris Kyle totaled 160 during the Global War on Terror.

 

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
Adelbert Waldron, America’s top sniper of the Vietnam War.

So, when it comes to Vietnam War snipers, the legendary “White Feather” ranks at number four.

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This is what jail is like on an aircraft carrier

Most sailors who go out on deployment don’t get into trouble. Others may find themselves on the wrong side of the shore patrol, though. Much of that can be minor, and is usually addressed with a loss of pay, or placing a sailor on restriction. But in some cases, that sailor needs to be confined.


Now, when you’re deployed to the Middle East, Mediterranean, or some other hot spot, it’s hard to ship the guy (or gal) back to the States to lock them up. So, on carriers and other large ships, the jail is brought with them – and it’s called the brig.

And in case you think that an upcoming battle earns some leeway for misbehavior, you’d best keep in mind that heading towards a fight won’t keep a sailor from getting tossed in the brig. In the book “Miracle at Midway,” historian Gordon Prange related how Marc Mitscher, captain of the aircraft carrier USS Hornet (CV 8), threw a couple of sailors in the brig for minor infractions prior to the Battle of Midway.

In many cases where that is necessary, the sailors are sent to the brig after what is known as a “Captain’s Mast,” which is covered under Article 15 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice. According to Naval Orientation, the amount of time someone may be confined is limited. The exact limits depend on the rank of the commanding officer and the rank of the accused. The chart below from the linked manual explains those limits.

 

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
(Scanned from US Navy publication)

The video clip below is from the 2008 documentary mini-series “Carrier,” produced by Mel Gibson’s production company. It provides a tour of the brig on the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) as it was in 2005.


Feature image: Screen capture from video link.

MIGHTY MOVIES

4 war movies rumored to release in 2019

There are definitely epic and unforgettable war films out there ( Saving Private Ryan, Full Metal Jacket, Top Gun*), but every year many war films are released under the radar (how many of you watched Thank You For Your Service? WELL YOU MISSED OUT. IT WAS FANTASTIC).

Service members have high standards for military movies — after all, they portray a life we led, and it’s not always easy to get it right. That won’t stop Hollywood from trying.

Nor should it. Films about the military inspire men and women to volunteer every day. They memorialize our heroes. And most importantly, they remind us of the horrors of war so we can, hopefully, pave a peaceful future for those who will serve after us.

Here are a few films on the slate for this year:

*Don’t be a hater — you know it’s 83% the reason why we have pilots


The Last Full Measure,2019,Sebastian Stan,Samuel L. Jackson,First Look

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The Last Full Measure

During the Vietnam War, an Air Force Pararescueman named William Pitsenbarger saved the lives of 60 soldiers and, when offered the chance to evacuate on a helicopter, he stayed behind to defend the lives of his men. 34 years later, he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

Acquired by Roadside Attractions and starring Captain America’s Sebastian Stan, Samuel L. Jackson, Ed Harris, Jeremy Irvine, and more, The Last Full Measure will recount Pitsenbarger’s heroism — and the survivors’ efforts to honor his memory.

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition

Greyhound

A World War II drama starring Tom Hanks, Greyhound is based on the C.S. Forester (ahem creator of Horatio Hornblower ahem) novel The Good Shepherd, in which a convoy of 37 Allied ships crosses the German U-boat infested Atlantic ocean. Hanks plays Ernest Krause, leader of the convoy and in command of his first ship, the Greyhound.

The screenplay is by Hanks himself and directed by Aaron Schneider. It is set to release on March 22, 2019,

Battle of Midway Tactical Overview – World War II | History

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Midway

Set to open during Veterans Day weekend, Midway is a World War II epic about the Battle of Midway in the Pacific, which would go down in history as the turning point in the war.

Lionsgate/Summit Entertainment hired Roland Emmerich to direct, with a cast that includes Woody Harrelson, Aaron Eckhart, Mandy Moore, and Luke Evans.

THE AFTERMATH | Official Trailer | FOX Searchlight

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The Aftermath

Set in a post-World War II Germany, Executive Producer Ridley Scott’s The Aftermath follows a British colonel (Jason Clarke) who oversees the reconstruction of a German city, his wife (Keira Knightley), and the German widower and father (played by Alexander Skarsgard) who previously occupied their new home.

Looks like this film will ponder the phrase “all’s fair in love and war.”

What’s your favorite war movie or tv show of all time? Leave me a comment on Facebook and let me know.

Articles

Metal Giants ‘Queensryche’ Take On War

There has been a major split between lead singer Geoff Tate and the rest of the band in recent months, but a few years ago, legendary metal band Queensryche was tightly focused on “American Soldier,” the band’s take on the modern experience of war.


Here’s the first video they produced for the album:

Humor

6 of the top ways to spot a veteran wannabe

America is full of some amazing, patriotic people who have gone to great lengths to serve their country. That said, there’s a countless number of people who didn’t serve who enjoy dressing the part for their personal entertainment.


And, frankly, there’s nothing wrong with that — as long as they don’t claim to be a veteran.

Here’s how you can spot a veteran wannabe.

Related: 6 ways you can tell a troop isn’t an infantryman

1. They use military terminology because they think it’s cool

“Let’s go Oscar Mike back to the COP before 1300 to get some chow and hit the head.”

Translation: Let’s go home before 1 o’clock to get some food and use the restroom. Oscar Mike means, “leaving.” COP stands for “Combat Outpost.”

Why can’t these people just talk normally? We know, it’s a damn shame.

2. They wear military-print everything

It’s no secret that camo print is a go-to style for many civilians. Sure, we get that. But it’s another thing when people wear camo day-in and day-out. Even if they never served, they want to look like they have.

3. They wear overpriced Spec Ops gear

Airsoft and paintball are pretty fun. Sometimes, however, the players buy over-the-top, faux-spec ops gear to immerse themselves in the military mindset.

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition

4. They wear their “serious faces” in group photos at the range

It’s hard to fully understand the struggle of grabbing a sushi lunch just an hour before charging the tree house guarded by the blue team. Make sure to take a photo to show how tough you are.

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition
The Most Expendables.

5. They bring up excuses as to why they didn’t serve — unprovoked

Not everyone was meant to join the military. Hell, even some people who join the military weren’t meant to be a part of the team. However, civilians frequently volunteer reasons as to why they didn’t join — often without prompt.

Just continue to be patriotic, that’s all we ask.

Also Read: 6 ways to avoid being ‘that guy’ in your unit

6. They think they’re an operator for conducting airsoft and paintball missions

Veterans across the globe reenact historic battles to preserve the memories of the men that served. However, if you civilians dressing up like a SEAL team and recreating the Osama bin Laden raid, that’s the ultimate red flag of the veteran wannabe.

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