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This tank-jet hybrid was used to put out oil fires set by Saddam's retreating troops

"Big Wind" is a 92,600-pound beast made from a tank chassis and two turbojet engines that are powerful enough to blow out oil fires like candles on a birthday cake.


While it looks ridiculous and would be nearly useless in a tank fight, this modified military hardware fought some of the largest fires set by Saddam Hussein's withdrawing army in the 1991 Persian Gulf War.

When oil wells are on fire, the pressure under the earth's crust keeps the oil rushing to the surface until the well is capped. Crews can't cap the well until the fire is put out.

We're talking about some big fires too. Photo: US Navy Lt. Steve Gozzo

"Big Wind" does this by interrupting the flow of oil into the air. A small crew moves the tank into position at 3 mph. The larger the fire, the closer the tank has to get. The largest fires burn at 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit and require the tank to pull within 30 feet.

Once there, the crew begins pumping water into the exhaust of the idling jet engines before ramping up the jet power. The result is a thick, fast-moving steam that cuts through the oil and smothers the fire. The fire, robbed of oxygen and separated from its fuel, quickly goes out. The "Big Wind" stays in position for another 20 minutes, spraying steam on the hot oil to cool it down.

Then, oil workers begin the dangerous job of capping the well.

See "Big Wind" in action in this video: