Articles

The 'combat diaper' is getting a sleek upgrade

The Army's new body armor designs — slated for fielding in 2019 — include a new protector for soldiers' most sensitive parts. The harness system protects the femoral arteries, pelvis, and lower abdomen.


A soldier wears the Blast Pelvic Protector, a replacement for the Protective Under Garment and Protective Outer Garment. (Photo: David Kamm)

The Blast Pelvic Protector will replace the Protective Outer Garment and Protective Under Garment, a two-piece system known as the "combat diaper" that was infamous for the chafing it caused in sensitive areas.

The POG and PUG have other issues besides causing chafing.

"The protection that existed before was letting debris in because it wasn't fitted close enough to the body," Cara Tuttle, an Army clothing designer and design lead for the harness said in a press release. "Soldiers weren't wearing it often enough, and it didn't come down inside of the leg to protect the femoral artery."

The Blast Pelvic Protector is an outer garment that provides increased protection from IED blasts and is more comfortable than current protection. (Photo: David Kamm)

Surgeons then had to attempt to remove as many small particles from wounded soldiers as they could, increasing the chances of an infection or other complications from surgery.

The new Blast Pelvic Protector covers troops from the waist, down the inner thighs, and around the back to the buttocks. This allows it to guard most of the vulnerable soft tissue in the thighs and provides much more protection for the arteries. Overlapping layers make the fabric protection very effective.

"A layer overlaps in one direction, then the next layer overlaps in the opposite direction, and it keeps alternating," Tuttle said. "This creates a better barrier for small [debris fragments], which would have to zig-zag through all these layers to get through."

And the BPP was designed for combat operations.

A series of buckles along the outside of the thighs and a waist strap hold the device in place while providing freedom of movement. Hopefully, the system will also do away with the discomfort of the combat diaper.