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The US is amping up its cyber war force

A decade ago, he was a young Army soldier training Iraqi troops when he noticed their primitive filing system: handwritten notes threaded with different colors of yarn, stacked in piles. For organization's sake, he built them a simple computer database.


Now an Army reservist, the major is taking a break from his civilian high-tech job to help America's technological fight against Islamic State extremists, part of a growing force of cyberexperts the Pentagon has assembled to defeat the group.

"The ability to participate in some way in a real mission, that is actually something that's rare, that you can't find in private sector," said the 38-year-old Nebraska native who is working at U.S. Cyber Command at Fort Meade, Maryland.

"You're part of a larger team putting your skills to use, not just optimizing clicks for a digital ad, but optimizing the ability to counter ISIS or contribute to the security of our nation."

Last year, then-Defense Secretary Ash Carter expressed frustration that the United States was losing the cyberwar against Islamic States militants. He pushed the Cyber Command to be more aggressive.

The files are in the computer. It's so simple. (Dept. of Defense photo)

In response, the Pentagon launched an effort to incorporate cyber technology into its daily military fight, including new ways to disrupt the enemy's communications, recruiting, fundraising, and propaganda.

To speak with someone at the front lines of the cyber campaign, The Associated Press agreed to withhold the major's name. The military says he could be threatened or targeted by the militants if he is identified publicly. The major and other officials wouldn't provide precise details on the highly classified work he is doing.

But Lt. Gen. Paul Nakasone, commander of U.S. Army Cyber Command, said the major is bringing new expertise for identifying enemy networks, pinpointing system administrators or developers, and potentially monitoring how the Islamic State's online traffic moves.

He "has the ability to bring an analytic focus of what the threat is doing, coupled with a really deep understanding of how networks run," Nakasone said, describing such contributions as "really helpful for us." He outlined a key question for the military: "How do you impact an adversary that's using cyberspace against us?"

The military services are looking for new ways to bring in more civilians with high-tech skills who can help against IS, and prepare for the new range of technological threats the nation will face.

Nakasone said that means getting Guard and Reserve members with technical expertise in digital forensics, math crypto-analysis and writing computer code. The challenge is how to find them.

"I would like to say it's this great database that we have, that we've been able to plug in and say, 'Show me the best tool developers and analysts that you have out there,'" Nakasone said. "We don't have that yet. We are going to have one, though, by June."

The Army Reserve is starting a pilot program cataloging soldiers' talents. Among 190,000 Army reservists, Nakasone said there might be up to 15,000 with some type of cyber-related skills. But there are legal and privacy hurdles, and any database hinges on reservists voluntarily and accurately providing information on their capabilities.

Marines with I Marine Expeditionary Force and sailors with 553 Cyber Protection Team, monitor network activity during I MEF Large Scale Exercise 2016 at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., Aug 22, 2016. (Photo: Marine Corps)

Normally, Nakasone said a reservist's record includes background, training, assignments, and schools attended.

"I would like to know every single person that has been trained as a certified ethical hacker," he said.

The Army has been steadily building cyber mission teams, as part of a broader Defense Department undertaking. Of the 41 Army teams, just over half come from theArmy National Guard and Army Reserve.

Nakasone said officials were still working out costs.

"The money will come," he said, because building a ready cyber force is necessary.

The Army major said others in the civilian high-tech industry are interested in helping.

Many would like to participate "in something bigger than themselves, something that has intrinsic value for the nation," he said.

The major said he has signed up for a second one-year tour in his cyber job. He is looking at options for staying longer.

"I find what I'm doing very satisfying, because I have an opportunity to implement things, to get things done and see them work and see tangible results," he said. "I'm not making as much as I was on the civilian side. But the satisfaction is that strong, and is that valuable, that it's worth it."

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