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These tough, grungy sailors are turning 75

A Navy Seabee is probably the one sailor that Marines love the most — next to the platoon doc, of course.


Camouflage is their typical working uniform. They spend most of their time in the field and dirt. They don't shy away from messy jobs. As one Marine captain once told a journalist in Iraq: Seabees build things, they blow things up, and they shoot straight.

Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 3, engage a simulated force during NMCB 3's Final Evaluation Problem (FEP). (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Michael Gomez/Released)

The Navy's "Can Do" sailors do a lot. They build field toilets and bunkers, construct camps and pour concrete, fix damaged utilities and buildings, help civilians in distress and even kill the enemy when required. Their work building airfields and camps across the Pacific during World War II undoubtedly helped in the allied victory.

A fraction of that force today, Navy Seabees are the backbone of the Naval Construction Force that includes 11 naval construction battalions and two amphibious construction battalions. Battalions send detachments of Seabees to as many as a dozen countries, and missions vary from repairing water lines, building schools and roads or pulling camp security.

Seabees serve in one of seven ratings – builder, construction mechanic, engineering aide, equipment operator, steelworker and utilitiesman – but every one will tell you they're a Jack-of-all-trades among warfighters. Seabee ingenuity gets things done.

The classic round Seabee logo of the "Fighting Bee" holding a Tommy gun, wrench, and hammer — one of only a few Navy-approved insignias that sailors can wear on their uniforms — is as relevant today, 75 years after the first Seabee units were formed, as it was on March 5, 1942.

Combat readiness is a critical a mission because Seabees training for, say, a western Pacific rotation to Okinawa might be sent to a combat zone elsewhere. "You could be building a schoolhouse in the Philippines... and go to war," said Chief Utilitiesman Phil Anderton, 31, a Seabee with Naval Construction Battalion 3 based at Port Hueneme, Calif.

Anderton learned that lesson as an 18-year-old Seabee in 2005. His battalion prepared to deploy to Rota, Spain, but " they canceled leave, and for three weeks we trained to go to war," he recalled. "It's like that fast. Three weeks." They ran scores of convoy security missions across volatile Iraq.

Seaman Jonathan Rosa and Petty Officer 2nd Class Leroy Jimmy, both assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 18 (NMCB 18) return fire during a training evolution as part of a field training exercise (FTX). (U.S. Navy Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Ian Carver/RELEASED).

It's little surprise that Seabees going through their battalion final training exercise, required to certify as combat-ready, looks like they're already in the hot zone. "This right here is the culmination of 'be ready for war.' It's awesome," Anderton said as he escorted a journalist through an expeditionary forward operating camp NMCB-3 built on an empty lot for its final training exercise at Fort Hunter-Liggett, Calif., last fall.

The air hummed with the sound of diesel trucks, generators and heavy machinery. Dust kicked up from medevac Humvee. The sound of gunfire echoed. Helping set that combat mindset was an opposing hostile force that kept trying to sneak along a creek to infiltrate perimeter lines and attack the camp. For three days since they arrived, and with little sleep, the battalion's 550 Seabees grappled with an indirect fire attack from the mock enemy that wounded 17 and damaged the nearby airfield.

"Lately we've been seeing the small-arms attacks in the dark," said Master-at-Arms 1st Class Matthew Lundeen, the quick reaction force commander.

In the midst, civilian-actors pleaded in their native language for the Americans to leave while others wanted their help, or so it seemed.

All Seabees get combat tactics training, and they have to learn what seasoned grunts do by instinct. "We put a lot on our E-4s and E-5s to make very sound, tactical decisions, putting bullets down the range to keep us safe," said Anderton, the Bravo Company operations chief and a former drill instructor. "The first line of defense is them. They're the ones in the pit when the aggressions happen."

"Making that tactical decision that is either going to put him in jail or save his life," he said. "That's the most critical, that they would pull the trigger at the right time."

"This is a pressurized environment that really tests the leaders," said Cmdr. Laurie Scott, NMCB-3's commander, especially for junior Seabees who haven't yet served overseas. "This is a lesson in sleep deprivation," he said. "You kind of get the sense of how people react under pressure."

The night before, a Seabee spotted some infiltrators in the scrub and bushes who had been harassing them. "We walked down to the lines and, sure enough, there was someone out there and we started shooting," said Steelworker 2nd Class Shianne Chlupacek with Charlie Platoon. "It was pretty cool."

A half-dozen or so enemy tried to infiltrate the camp. "We saw them with the thermals setting up," Builder 3rd Class John Skoblicki[cqgf] said. "They set up right in between (Pit) 4 and 3, and then they opened up. We shot back."

Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 15, pour concrete as they work to complete a runway expansion project. NMCB 15 is currently mobilized in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and is an expeditionary element of U.S. Naval Forces that support various units worldwide through national force readiness, civil engineering, humanitarian assistance, and building and maintaining infrastructure. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Garas)

"We'd been tracking them for awhile," as enemy flashlights prodding the pit line gave them away, said Steelworker Seaman Korey Benton[cqgf], 20. "We engaged and fired back," added Skoblicki. No casualties among the Seabees, but Skoblicki blew through the first can of ammo with the M240 machinegun before it jammed with the blanks. "It tends to do that," he said. Benton provided covering fire with the M16 rifle until they could get the 240 up and running. "You just have to keep racking," he said.

Chlupacek stood in an M16 pit the Seabees carved from the brown-mocha dirt with their E-tools and the help of a Catepillar 420 backhoe. (To a Marine, it's a fighting hole. To Seabees, it's a "defensive fighting pit.") "It's definitely part of being a Seabee," said Chlupacek, who grew up around farms and hunting and got into welding in her small Nebraska town.

This was her third FTX. A cold front had blown chilly rain through the region just as the Seabees arrived to build their FOB. "It was the first day when we started doing trenching. It was hard to keep morale up," she said. "I'd walk the lines for about 16 hours, and I'd keep telling the troops that it'll be over soon. It was wet and it was cold."

"Once you get entrenched, it's pretty easy," she said. "We didn't get entrenched until the third day we were here. At first, it was just sitting on the ground, in like a skirmish room."

Perhaps more than most seagoing sailors, Chlupacek is comfortable in the rugged outdoors. "I love tactics, so this is one of my favorite things to do," she said. "You get in the game, and you feel it. OK, there's enemy out there, and let's kill 'em. I like it."

Living like a grunt isn't for every Seabee. Others take well to the "build-fight" life. "I love either side, tactics or building. I joined to be a Seabee," said Builder 2nd Class Harlee Annis, 23, of Ukiah, Calif., who enlisted after he saw a pamphlet about Seabees while at a junior college. "I got my first gun when I was 7 years old."

On this day, Annis was the gunner who manned the M16 service rifle, a qualification he earned during NMCB-3's "homeport" period at Port Hueneme. "This is probably the funnest part, to get to fire it," he said. He wasn't on shift during the attack the previous night and was eager to get this first shot off. "I was hoping," he said. "Today. Maybe."

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