Articles

These vets opened a coffee cafe -- and found community

If you've ever worked a job that you hate, you know how unfulfilling it can be spending hour after hour trying to stop day-dreaming scenarios in which your life hadn't led you to this point.


A couple of years ago, Ben Owen and Brolen Jourdan found themselves in just this situation. Both veterans with history in the food service and hospitality industries, the office job life just wasn't providing the stimulation or reward they were used to. Together, they decided to do something about it, and in July 2016, they opened the doors to their cafe, Liberation Coffee Co. in Coppell, Texas.

"We liberated ourselves from lives we were unhappy with and followed our dreams to open a shop," says Owen, who in addition to needing a career change, saw a need within his community as well. "I live in the area and was always on the hunt for a craft shop that was convenient. It was a tough ticket to fill, so we built one."

Our shop is pretty straightforward, with no frills, doing our best to do a few things well.

Like many veterans, Owen's experiences in the armed forces — he served both in the Army and the Air Force — have informed much of his worldview, including his philosophies on running a business.

"I think that my years in the service come through in our model quite a bit," he says. "Our shop is pretty straightforward, with no frills, doing our best to do a few things well."

The craft coffee industry can feel a little over-the-top, Owen says, sometimes sacrificing form for fashion. While latte art and trendy aprons can do plenty to garner the attention of consumers, they can act as a deterrent to people seeking a plain cup of coffee. He hopes he can bridge the disconnect he perceives between craft coffee and vets.

"I can't speak for all vets, but I think there is definitely a disconnect between the veteran community and craft coffee shops," Owen says. "We're used to function over form, so a lot of folks don't know what they're missing. Using my veteran status, I hope to alleviate that disconnect and bring other vets some quality coffee they might not otherwise seek out. We offer a military discount, and I'm always up for talking shop with my fellow servicemen and women."

This philosophy of function over form is evident upon entering the space. Absent are the forests-worth of wood, exposed brick walls, and upcycled furniture composing the aesthetics of many DFW specialty cafes. In their place are comfy armchairs, tasteful light fixtures and Ed Sheeran on the sound-system.

Despite these "second-wave" aesthetics, the underlying care for the craft of coffee is apparent from the Kalita Wave pour-over drippers on the shelves to the coffee taster's flavor wheel poster displayed prominently on the wall.

Also read: A brief history of coffee in the US military

Liberation's coffee is courtesy of Eiland Coffee Roaster's, which, as one of DFW's oldest specialty roasting companies, has been producing traditionally roasted coffees in Richardson since 1998. A variety of blends and single-origin offerings are available as both drip and pour-over, and while the espresso is dialed in, the milk could use some work.

In addition to coffee, a variety of pastries like a rosemary-provolone scone ($3.50) and blueberry bread ($2.59) are available from Zenzero Kitchen & Bakery, as well as macarons in flavors like espresso, strawberry and honey (all $2) from Joe the Baker.

The food and coffee menus cover all the necessary bases for coffee-house expectations without complicating things too much, making decisions quick and easy. Drinks come out quickly as well, so if you're in need of a commuter-cup in the morning, don't let the absence of a drive-thru fool you into thinking you don't have time to pop in and out.

Establishing a specialty coffee presence in an area like Coppell can be challenging, but Liberation Coffee's lack of pretension, cozy and casual environment and friendly staff all bode well for their success in the area.

"We want to make coffee accessible," Owen says. "The community here is very locally focused, so for us, it's important to do right by these folks. We try to offer the very best we can to continue to support that local mentality."

The brand has plans for a small expansion within Coppell, in addition to simply growing their business in their current space. They may have forgotten about Zenzero when writing their Facebook bio claiming the title of "first specialty shop in Coppell," but it's great to see the coffee community growing in the area all the same.

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