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This group helps vets heal on the hunt

FORT ASHBY, W.Va. — It can be a challenge to reintegrate from the military into civilian life, especially if you've lost a limb and your former toe is now your thumb, Mike Trost said.


And he would know.

Trost, 53, of Maryville, Tennessee, served in the U.S. Army for 32 years until he suffered serious injuries in 2012.

"I was shot with a machine gun in southeastern Afghanistan," he said of being hit in both legs, buttocks and his right hand.

Trost lost a leg and fingers, but via modern medical technology, he gained a toe for a thumb.

While he talks casually about his hand and refers to his new thumb as "Toemos," Trost knows all too well recovery can be a physically and emotionally painful, long journey.

"It's good to be around like company," Trost said of spending time with veterans who sustained traumatic experiences during their time in the military. "There's a bond. It's different than you have with regular friends."

Trost on Friday was in Fort Ashby for a turkey hunt that's part of Operation Heroes Support — a local veteran-operated, nonprofit that provides outdoor experiences for disabled veterans, firefighters, police officers and first responders.

"The whole thing with the hunts is just to make you feel, even for one day, that there's ... nothing wrong with you," he said. "And the people here are fantastic. They give a lot of time and energy."

Trost and several other veterans from Wednesday through Sunday were at the residence of Bruce Myers and his wife Judy, located in rural West Virginia.

In addition to hunting, the group fished in a lake owned by Dave and Joyce Cooper -- neighbors of the Myers couple. Skeet shooting was also on the agenda.

The Myers's hosted a similar event last year and hope to continue the tradition.

"The veterans, they deserve it ... they sacrificed," Bruce Myers said of the former military members who were injured during their service to country.

Steven Curry, 33, of Nokesville, Virginia, was new to this year's Fort Ashby hunt and killed his first two turkeys -- a 19-pounder on Thursday and a bird that weighed over 20 pounds on Friday.

"It's pretty exciting," he said of his hunting success. "We were only in the woods about 20 minutes when I shot the first turkey."

Curry was in a U.S. Army infantry unit from 2003 to 2008. During his service, he was hit by an improvised explosive device while in Iraq.

As a result, his left leg was amputated below his knee, he had a mild brain injury and suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder.

Brandon Rethmel, 30, of Pittsburgh, brought his wife and three young children to the event.

Rethmel was in the U.S. Army from 2006 to 2012. During that time, he was injured by a rocket in Afghanistan.

"I lost my leg below the knee," he said. His right tricep was also destroyed and he suffered other shrapnel wounds.

"When I got out (of the military) I didn't connect with people," he said. "I isolated myself ... It was really hard."

Rethmel said Operation Heroes Support and events including the hunt, as well as support from his family, helped him reclaim his purpose.

"It's saved my life," he said. "It's just really a great program and I hope more (veterans) get involved."

Greg Hulver, 49, of Kirby, West Virginia, specialized in communications for the U.S. Navy from about 1985 to 1997. Today, he suffers from back injuries and other ailments including PTSD. The hunting events offer him a way to give and receive help, he said

"My military bond is what I have with these guys and that means the most to me," he said. "There's just something between us you can't replace and you can't get it anywhere else."

Brady Jackson, 32, of Bristol, Virginia, returned to the event this year to help other veterans.

"I'd never gotten a chance to turkey hunt," he said of his first experience at the Fort Ashby event last year. "I just had an absolutely amazing time."

He started volunteering to help get donations for Operation Heroes Support in the fall.

"It's honestly changed my life," Jackson said of working with other veterans. "It's given me a sense of purpose since I got out of the military."

Jackson was in the U.S. Army for nine years. He was deployed to Iraq where he sustained minor blast trauma, burns and cuts from an explosion. While he knows he was lucky to survive that incident without serious injuries, he needed to spend time with others who understood his experiences.

That's where Operation Heroes Support came in, he said.

"It's more about campfire therapy than it is about hunting," he said. "It's about building relationships."

Charles Harris, 26, a native of Placerville, California who now lives in Romney, West Virginia, lost his legs after being injured in 2012 while in a U.S. Army infantry unit.

Today, Harris is the president of the local Operation Heroes Support organization.

"It's given me the ability to give back," he said of his work with the group. "It's like we're back in the military (because) you can count on these guys ... It's like family."

Harris said the group hopes to grow, include more public servants such as firefighters and police as well as military veterans. To make that happen, donations of cash, meals, airline tickets and other items and services are needed.

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