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This is why the Apache is a flying fortress

Considered the most advanced attack helicopter in the Army's arsenal, the AH-64 Apache has racked up 4.2 million flight hours and counting since Boeing delivered the aircraft in 1984.


"This is the most survivable safest aircraft in the Army's inventory," Chief Warrant Officer 2 Josh Harris explains during an interview. "Hands down."

This impressive piece of aviation comes equipped with laser-guided Hellfire missiles, 70mm rockets, and a 30mm automatic machine gun that's capable of firing up to 650 rounds per minute.

War. It's fantastic! (Images via Giphy)

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When fired, the Apache's 30mm machine gun is so intense it vibrates the pilot's internal organs, teeth, and the retinas in their eyes — along with helicopter's mechanical parts.

This Boeing-made helicopter can not only dish it out, but it can take a beating too.

The Apache's crew station houses sophisticated ballistic-tolerant seats comprised of kevlar and ceramic. The aircraft's fuel tanks also have a few special defense surprises for enemy grounds troops that are attempting to blow this fly fortress out of the sky.

Also Read: This is what happens when the Army puts a laser on an Apache attack helicopter

The fuel tanks are ballistic-tolerant as well and capable of sealing up .50 caliber rounds trying to penetrate.

But the real tactical advantage is the tank contains nitrogen, which is a part of a unique system where it removes the oxygen out of the fuel tank so that the gas becomes another barrier level for incoming rounds.

At the end of some missions, the Apache's crew has to fish out enemy bullets from the fuel tank. That's what we call impressive.

Check out the Smithsonian Channel's video below to see what makes the innovative aircraft so dang special for yourself.

(Smithsonian Channel, YouTube)