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This man lost 90 pounds to enlist in the Marines

About a dozen young men and women are gathered at a shopping center, lining up outside Marine Corps Recruiting Sub-Station here, to prepare for the challenges of recruit training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina.


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Some recruits are more prepared than others. Some still have ground to cover and goals to obtain, but 17-year-old Demetri E. Ramos has covered more ground than his peers.

Demetri E. Ramos with Marine Corps Recruiting Sub-Station Glen Burnie performs a "buddy exercise" during a physical training session. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Devin Nichols)

Over the past three years he lost about 90 pounds to be eligible to enlist in the United States Marine Corps. He started his journey at 260 pounds and now weighs 170 pounds.

His stepfather, Robert Haag, challenged him during his freshman year to turn his life around. Haag noticed his stepson would spend many hours every day playing video games in the basement of his house. Haag approached Ramos and challenged him to earn his place on "the wall."

"There is a big wall in our house that you have to earn your way [onto]," Haag said. On this wall are photos of six current and former Marines.

Setting a Goal

"My stepfather told me if I go from 260 pounds to 180 pounds, he would buy me an Xbox One," said Ramos, a Severna Park High School native. At first, Ramos was hesitant about the large amount of weight he would have to lose.

But, he said, after eating healthier and spending long hours in the gym with his stepbrother he accomplished his goal.

After graduating high school this past spring, Ramos' stepbrother and stepfather, who are both Marines, went with him to visit the local Marine Corps Recruiting Station, a trip that would change his life forever.

Ramos added he always looked up to and admired the Marines in his family because of their character and values they learned.

"To see the dedication he had before talking to [us] was incredible," said Gunnery Sgt. Jason Irwin, the commander of the Glen Burnie Marine recruiting office. "You can definitely see the commitment he had to make himself eligible for enlistment, and to take the initial steps of becoming a United States Marine."

"It wasn't fun being incapable of doing things because of my weight, or being out of shape and not progressing," Ramos said. "My motivation initially started with these restrictions and it grew more and more when I continued to lose weight and wanted to continue to make myself better as a person."

Ramos is scheduled to attend recruit training at the end of this year, and according to Irwin, "he is pumped and ready to go."

"If you never have confidence in yourself, you're not going to go anywhere," he said.