Articles

Need to see bad guys at night? This vet-run company helps MAWL the opposition

The company that makes some of the military's most advanced laser and infrared beam illuminators has just released a civilian-legal version of it's rifle-mounted sight used by some of America's top troopers.


Laser and IR sight maker BE Meyers & Co. commercialized its MAWL-DA laser illumination and designation device and dubbed it the "MAWL-C1+." The sight complies with federal mandates on civilian-legal laser strength and performs almost as well is the ones special operators use in the field.

This is a big deal — but to understand why it's a big deal, one must know a little more about the company and about the original MAWL itself.

Many of you reading this already know BE Meyers & Co., albeit indirectly. If you've ever been in a contact while a Forward Air Controller laser designated a target, or stood by while a TACP pointed out a place that needed a little special CAS love, you know BE Meyers. They're the folks who designed and built the IZLID for air-to-ground integration.

They're also the company behind the GLARE RECOIL some of you gyrenes have picked up for some additional less-lethal capability (that's some effective Hail and Warning right there).

Additionally, the IZLID makes for an excellent force multiplier if you need to zap someone (or at least point them out for someone in an aircraft to zap) or obtain PID a klick away...with a beam that's invisible to the naked eye.

So, now you know where they're coming from.

Last summer BE Meyers & Co. released the MAWL-DA. Modular Advanced Weapon Laser (Direct Action). By numerous user accounts, the MAWL-DA was the greatest innovation in weaponized photonics (hell, any photonics) in a generation.

Apparently it really is that good.

Here's a photo representation of what the MAWL-C1+ can do in using its IR pointer in low-light conditions. (Photo: BE Meyers)

The MAWL is an aiming laser that features a visible green laser, an IR pointer and a predetermined battery of IR illuminators (each intended for a specific operating environment). It's ambi operated, low profile, tucked in close to the bore (so you don't have to worry about mechanical offset), and easy to operate under stress (in the dark, wearing gloves, while dudes are trying to kill you or keep from being killed).

Every anecdotal report we've heard — and there have been several — indicate this thing performs significantly better than the PEQ-15. And because it's modular, it's easier to maintain.

Did we mention the HMFIC over at BE Meyers is an infantry combat veteran of both Iraq and Afghanistan?

BE Meyers President Matthew Meyers served in both Iraq and Afghanistan. (Photo: BE Meyers)

Requests for a commercial "civilian" version of the MAWL that doesn't break the Federally mandated 0.7mW barrier have been incessant. We know, because we're some of those who've been asking.

Now a device very nearly as good as the military version, but still far superior to anything else out there we're familiar with, is available for individual purchase. So whether you're about to deploy and your unit doesn't have them, a LEO who understands the significant advantages of a device like this, or a responsible armed citizen who wants one Because Reasons, you're good to go.

What the company tell us about the civilian-legal MAWL-C1+ is big brain speak. Up front though, what the end user needs to know is that you can use it intuitively and in a wide variety of operational conditions; for instance you can roll from a stack outdoors to indoors and back out adjusting the intensity and flood as you go without ever having to fumble-fart around with knobs and buttons and dials.

Just as importantly, you can punch way out there with it when you need to, even in an environment filled with photonic barriers like fog, smoke, or ambient light.

Learn more about the BE Meyers MAWL-C1+ right here.

 

GEAR & TECH

6 of the most notable pre-M16 military guns

Throughout history, the U.S. Military has used a wide variety of guns to win its battles. Prior to the M16, there were several weapons used across the service throughout some of the most devastating wars the world has ever seen.

Here are some of those weapons:

Keep reading... Show less
Articles

How R. Lee Ermey's Hollywood break is an inspiration to us all

While there have been many outstanding actors and celebrities who have raised their right hand, there has never been a veteran who could finger point his way to the top of Hollywood stardom quite like the late great Gunnery Sergeant R. Lee Ermey.

Keep reading... Show less
International

China and the US could end up in a war – here's what would happen

It's unlikely that the U.S.-China trade dispute is going to escalate to a full-scale war any time soon — but it's not impossible. Neither side is inclined to go to war with the other, but a war of that scale is what both plan to fight. All it would take is one bungled crisis, one itchy trigger finger, one malfunctioning automated defense system and the entire region could become a war zone.

Keep reading... Show less
Lists

Here are the best military photos for the week of April 20th

The military is always evolving and new things happen every day. With each changes comes a new set of challenges and new opportunities to succeed. Thankfully, there are many talented photographers in the community that capture these struggles and triumphs.

Keep reading... Show less
History

5 ways troops accidentally 'blue falcon' the rest of the platoon

Every now and then, the pricks known as 'Blue Falcons' come and ruin things for everyone else. They break the rules and make everyone else suffer. They rat out their brothers- and sisters-in-arms. They even damage the reputation of others to make themselves look better.

Keep reading... Show less
Articles

Why I'm thrilled Brie Larson will play Captain Marvel

Look, the Marvel Cinematic Universe is really lighting my fires when it comes to their female superheroes.

When Marvel Studios announced they would be bringing Captain Marvel to the big screen, I was thrilled. I was also immediately invested and my expectations shot through the roof.

Keep reading... Show less
History

This is how American pilots used drop tanks as bombs during WWII

If you pay attention, you might sometimes see long, cigar-shaped pods firmly attached to the undersides of classic fighter and attack aircraft, sometimes with unit markings on them.

Known as "drop tanks," these simple devices extend the range of the aircraft they're hooked up to by carrying extra usable fuel. Back during World War II, however, attack pilots found a secondary use for drop tanks as improvised bombs, used to bombard enemy ground positions.

Keep reading... Show less

The hilarious ways Chinese police are combating jaywalkers

China is so desperate to stop jaywalkers it has turned to spraying them with water.

In Daye, in the central Hubei province, one pedestrian crossing has had a number of bright yellow bollards installed that spray wayward pedestrians' feet with water mist.

Keep reading... Show less