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This Nigerian woman stopped hunting antelope to shoot terrorists

For the terrorist group whose name translates to "Western Education is Forbidden," Aisha Bakari Gombi's name means getting schooled on the battlegrounds of sub-Saharan Africa.


"Boko Haram know me and fear me," says Gombi.

Gombi's title is now "Queen Hunter" for her prowess in fighting terrorist cells in the country. According to the Guardian's Rosie Collyer, she commands men who communicate using sign language, animal sounds, and birdsong.

Boko Haram, the junior varsity ISIS, still somehow manages to ill innocent civilians and wreak havoc across Nigeria.

Her home as a youth is a town called Gombi, near Nigeria's Sambisa Forest, which is now rife with Boko Haram extremists. This is a short drive from where 200 girls were kidnapped in 2014.

Gombi has been a member of the local hunter's club since she was in her youth, taught to hunt by her grandfather.

"We could free them if the military would give us better weapons," she told the Guardian as she eyed a double-barreled shotgun on her lap.

In the same forest where she once hunted antelope for food, she now hunts Boko Haram fighters for vengeance. Many other women in the village have since joined the hunt for terrorist fighters, many to avenge missing loved ones abducted by the group.

Aisha Bakari Gombi. (Photo by Rosie Collyer)

Many other women in the village have since joined the hunt for terrorist fighters, many to avenge missing loved ones abducted by the group. There are now 228 hunters in Gombi's village who have been recruited by the government to help fight terrorists.

Aisha Bakari Gombi vows never to stop fighting Boko Haram until her village is free from their threat. The only thing holding her back is the resources required to go on the offensive.

"I'm waiting for a call authorizing me to go back to rescue those women and children from Daggu, but I don't know if they will give us more arms," she says.