Articles

'Vets Make Movies' lets former troops express themselves with film


(Photo courtesy of LACMA)

On any given weekend, visitors to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art might notice a gathering of fledgling filmmakers behind cameras capturing some action or seated in front of desktop editing station assembling their footage into a coherent narrative.

And the sight of filmmakers hard at work might not strike passersby as unusual -- after all, this is LA, home of Hollywood and the epicenter of the movie business. But this group at LACMA isn't just any collection of potential Spielbergs or Bays.

Welcome to "Veterans Make Movies," a three-year initiative focused on highlighting the veteran experience presented in collaboration with the Los Angeles Public Library. In 2013, LAPL launched Veterans Resource Centers within library branches throughout Los Angeles in response to the growing need for veteran support programs and social services.

Watch "Tacit Veritas" by veteran filmmaker Levi Preston:

The library identified the lack of an expressive outlet for veterans to share their perspectives about service or their unique coming home story to a wider audience of both veterans and civilians, so LACMA offered to develop a multilayered filmmaking program tailored to veterans' personal, creative, and social needs, building on the museum's ongoing initiative to engage communities through art and film. The program is free to students, in part due to the support of organizations like the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Sony Pictures Entertainment, and The Safeway Foundation.

VMM is an 8-week curriculum that takes a group of 16 military veterans through a series of 3-hour workshops taught by artists and industry experts. The graduation exercise for each student is to create a 3-minute short film suitable for screening at the end of the session.

"These classes are designed to take somebody who's never picked up a camera before and learn how to make a film," says Sarah Jesse, LACMA's associate vice president of education.

Watch "A Chaos Within" by veteran filmmaker Jason Fracaro:

Jesse explains that the basic premise of the course is that when it comes to the medium of film, "you can't separate the technical aspect from the story aspect."

The course starts with analysis of a wide variety of filmmaking technics "to give students a sense of how others have communicated," Jesse says. That's followed by reflective writing exercises that are then morphed into storyboards that guide the filmmakers as they actually shoot the footage. After that comes the extensive process of editing and post producing the work, arguably the most important part of realizing the artistic vision.

Jesse points out that an important part of getting vet students into the right frame of mind is creating the right atmosphere.

VMM participants work on post production. (Photo courtesy of LACMA)

"It's a safe place where vets feel comfortable sharing experience," she says. "It's not a therapy program, but art-making is cathartic."

Jesse explains that halfway through the second session the instructors, who are also veterans, feel like they have added to their knowledge of the military community as much as they've managed to teach the students about filmmaking.

"The vet experience is diverse and people can have a lot of different types of jobs in uniform," she says. "We went into this thinking we were going to bridge the military-civilian divide but we've also seen a vet-vet divide."

Jesse says the instructors have noted a camaraderie develop between the vets over the course of the eight weekends they spend together.

"They crew for each other's films," she says. "They help each other out."

Word-of-mouth about VMM has quickly spread around the LA veteran community.

"We've had a ton of people apply," Jesse says. "It's catching on."

Veterans can begin to apply for VMM's winter/spring session starting October 15, 2016. Access the application here.

To watch other veteran-made movies created in the VMM program go here.

And if you're going to be in LA on October 30, check out VMM's celebration of Veterans in the Arts and Humanities Day. Television legend Norman Lear (creator of "All in the Family," "One Day at a Time," and "Maude") will be in attendance to screen a collection of veteran films. For more information go here.

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